Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an unordered_map<Block, int> with Block being a simple struct defined as follows:

struct Block {
    size_t start;
    size_t end;

    bool operator==(const Block& b) const {
        return start == b.start && end == b.end;
    }
};

namespace std {
template<>
struct hash<Block> {
    size_t operator()(const Block& b) const {
        return b.start;
    }
};
} 

When trying to access the map, I do get the following error message in gdb (same for both g++ 4.7.1 as well as clang++ 3.1):

Program received signal SIGFPE, Arithmetic exception.
0x0000000000401e0b in std::__detail::_Mod_range_hashing::operator() (this=0x7fffffffd8e0, __num=0, __den=0)
    at /usr/include/c++/4.7/bits/hashtable_policy.h:245
245     { return __num % __den; }

My libstdc++ version is 3.4.17 (i.e. the version from GCC 4.7)

Relevant backtrace:

#0  0x0000000000401e0b in std::__detail::_Mod_range_hashing::operator() (this=0x7fffffffd8e0, __num=0, __den=0)
    at /usr/include/c++/4.7/bits/hashtable_policy.h:245
#1  0x0000000000407199 in std::__detail::_Hash_code_base<Block, std::pair<Block const, int>, std::_Select1st<std::pair<Block const, int> >, std::hash<Block>, std::__detail::_Mod_range_hashing, std::__detail::_Default_ranged_hash, true>::_M_bucket_index (this=0x7fffffffd8e0, __c=0, __n=0) at /usr/include/c++/4.7/bits/hashtable_policy.h:787
#2  0x0000000000405230 in std::_Hashtable<Block, std::pair<Block const, int>, std::allocator<std::pair<Block const, int> >, std::_Select1st<std::pair<Block const, int> >, std::equal_to<Block>, std::hash<Block>, std::__detail::_Mod_range_hashing, std::__detail::_Default_ranged_hash, std::__detail::_Prime_rehash_policy, true, false, true>::_M_bucket_index
    (this=0x7fffffffd8e0, __k=..., __c=0) at /usr/include/c++/4.7/bits/hashtable.h:466
#3  0x00000000004038de in std::__detail::_Map_base<Block, std::pair<Block const, int>, std::_Select1st<std::pair<Block const, int> >, true, std::_Hashtable<Block, std::pair<Block const, int>, std::allocator<std::pair<Block const, int> >, std::_Select1st<std::pair<Block const, int> >, std::equal_to<Block>, std::hash<Block>, std::__detail::_Mod_range_hashing, std::__detail::_Default_ranged_hash, std::__detail::_Prime_rehash_policy, true, false, true> >::at (
    this=0x7fffffffd8e0, __k=...) at /usr/include/c++/4.7/bits/hashtable_policy.h:474
#4  0x0000000000403001 in SplicedAlignment::FindOptimalEndBlock() const::{lambda(Block const&)#1}::operator()(Block const&) const (__closure=0x7fffffffd990, block=...) at splicing.cpp:151
#5  0x00000000004040b3 in std::for_each<__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<Block const*, std::vector<Block, std::allocator<Block> > >, SplicedAlignment::FindOptimalEndBlock() const::{lambda(Block const&)#1}>(__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<Block const*, std::vector<Block, std::allocator<Block> > >, SplicedAlignment::FindOptimalEndBlock() const::{lambda(Block const&)#1}, SplicedAlignment::FindOptimalEndBlock() const::{lambda(Block const&)#1}) (__first=..., __last=..., __f=...)
    at /usr/include/c++/4.7/bits/stl_algo.h:4442

Edit: I didn't think it would actually make a difference where I call the function as long as I give it the same arguments, but apparently it does:

std::for_each(blocks.begin(), blocks.end(), [&](const Block& block) {
    map.at(block);
}

leads to the error, while just having:

const Block& block = blocks[0];
map.at(block);

works perfectly fine (blocks being a simple vector<Block>&)

share|improve this question
    
Unrelated to your problem, but you should never put functions/classes/etc. in the std namespace. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 27 '12 at 9:23
    
Here the possible duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/8286103/… –  Sergey Nov 27 '12 at 9:24
1  
@Joachim No idea when the g smuggled itself in there ;) Also added the gdb backtrace. About the std namespace: As I understand it that's the way to go if I don't want to specify the hash function everytime I declare a map with my struct - if there's a better way I'm all ears obviously, but since I'm only specializing an existing struct that shouldn't be that bad should it? –  Voo Nov 27 '12 at 9:30
1  
@juanchopanza Yes I do, the problem doesn't seem to be the hashfunction itself, but the fact that the internal variable den of the map is 0 when it obviously shouldn't be. –  Voo Nov 27 '12 at 9:36
2  
@JoachimPileborg, what do you mean by your first comment? Specializing std::hash must be done in std:: and it is perfectly legitimate. Your advice is good, but specialization is an exception. (another common example is specializing std::less) –  Johan Lundberg Dec 28 '12 at 18:50

2 Answers 2

Aside: if your hash function cannot throw then it's quite important to give it a noexcept exception-specification, otherwise the hash table needs to store every element's hash code alongside the element itself (which increases memory usage and affects performance) so that container operations that must not throw do not have to recalculate the hash code.

The SIGFPE implies a divide by zero and from the backtrace it happens here:

    { return __num % __den; }

which probably means __den is zero. That value comes from the hash map's bucket count, which should not be zero.

Can you confirm that when it crashes m._M_bucket_count is zero?

If so, that either indicates you've corrupted the map somehow (have you tried compiling with -D_GLIBCXX_DEBUG to turn on the libstdc++ Debug Mode checks? Have you tried running under valgrind?) or there's a bug in the libstdc++ code.

share|improve this answer

I had exactly the same problem. It was caused by memset accidentally applied to container data.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.