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Is it possible to register with the unity container the following recursive structure:

public interface IFoo
{
    IBar[] Bars { get; set; }
}

public interface IBar
{
    IFoo[] Foos { get; set; }
}

Assuming multiple named instances exist for each interface:

public class Foo1 : IFoo 
{
    public IBar[] Bars { get; set; }
}

public class Foo2 : IFoo
{
    public IBar[] Bars { get; set; }
}

public class Bar1 : IBar
{
    public IFoo[] Foos { get; set; }
}

public class Bar2 : IBar
{
    public IFoo[] Foos { get; set; }
}

And the registration:

var container = new UnityContainer();

container.RegisterType<IFoo, Foo1>("foo1");
container.RegisterType<IFoo, Foo2>("foo2");
container.RegisterType<IBar, Bar1>("bar1");
container.RegisterType<IBar, Bar2>("bar2");

var instanceOfBar = container.Resolve<IBar>("bar1");

How to configure Unity container so that the collection properties are automatically injected?

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I don't see any DependencyAttribute on your properties. Is this intended? –  Wiktor Zychla Nov 27 '12 at 9:27
    
How do you envisage the collection being initialised? –  podiluska Nov 27 '12 at 9:32
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is a way to annotate a property to be a dependency. But in your case this will not work because of the infiniteness of resolution process. Simply you will get stackoverflow exception. To implement such structures I use lazy pattern so I resolve such collection only if needed:

 Func<IFoo[]> resolver;
 IFoo[] value;
 public IFoo[] Foos { get{
      if(value == null) value = resolver();
         return value;
     } 
 }

to make Func<IFoo[]> resolvable from container add this:

 container.RegisterInstance<Func<IFoo[]>>(e => e.Resolve<IFoo[]>());

resolution of array or elements is done out of the box by unity it simply maps to ResolveAll.

Then simply inject Func<IFoo[]> through your constructor.

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But as soon as you attempt to resolve all the Foo objects you'll need to reolve each Foo objects Bar property, which then sets of a circular dependency. A lazy load just defers the problem, it doesn't solve it. –  Faster Solutions Nov 27 '12 at 9:58
    
@Faster Solutions The idea is that at some point you wont access the property at all. So you will break this circular dependency. Otherwise such structure is pointless regardless if you are using unity or not. –  Rafal Nov 27 '12 at 10:07
    
I hear you. My concern is that this is basically an accident waiting to happen. it does break the circular dependency but it's fragile. Really, what needs to happen is the data structure of the class needs to change for this approach to work in a robust manner. –  Faster Solutions Nov 27 '12 at 10:20
    
I agree that this structure is faulty but question is abstract and very specific so I have answered the question. With a modification that would force unity to create instances of IFoo and IBar only once this is really useful solution. –  Rafal Nov 27 '12 at 10:26
    
I think we're differing on shades of grey. We both say that the structure won't really work with Unity. The main difference between our answers is I say fix the underlying otherwise it won't work and you're saying here is a workaround but it contains risks. My preference is always to fix the underlying because it inevitably comes back to bite you in the end. –  Faster Solutions Nov 27 '12 at 10:39
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The simple answer to your question is no. Unity will regard that as a circular reference if, by resolving Foo, you instantiate one or more Bar objects which, in turn, instantiate some Foo objects.

Circular references are an issue with Unity: Circular References

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