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I am currently writing a multithreaded program where a thread may sometimes be created depending on certain circumstances. If this thread is created it needs to run independently of all other threads and I cannot afford to block any other threads to wait for it to join. The length of time the spawned thread runs for varies; sometimes it can take up to a few hours.

I have tried spawning the thread and putting a join in the destructor of the class which works fine, however if the code within the spawned thread finishes a long time before the destructor is called (which will be around 99% of the time) I would like the thread to kill itself freeing all its resources etc.

I looked into using detach for this, but you can't rejoin a detached thread and on the off chance the destructor is called before this thread finishes then the spawned thread will not finish and could have disastrous consequences.

Is there any possible solution that ensures the thread finishes before the class is destructed as well as allowing it to join as soon as the thread finishes its work?

I am using boost/c++11 for threading. Any help at all would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

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Edited. Just any help at all would be great thanks –  const_ref Nov 27 '12 at 10:05
1  
You might want to look into std::notify_all_at_thread_exit. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 27 '12 at 10:06
    
@JoachimPileborg Thanks will look into it –  const_ref Nov 27 '12 at 10:23
    
why do you think a thread that has finished has not destroyed all its resources ? –  Stephane Rolland Nov 27 '12 at 11:07
    
@StephaneRolland I need to ensure that when this thread starts that it finishes completely. If it stopped halfway through completion it would have a lot of adverse effects on my whole project. I didnt state that a thread that has finishes will not destroy resources. –  const_ref Nov 27 '12 at 11:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The thread may detach itself, releasing its resources. If the destructor sees that the thread is joinable, i.e. still running, let it join. If the thread reaches its end, self-detach. Possible race condition: is_joinable() returns true in destructor - thread detaches itself - destructor joins and fails miserably. So use a mutex guarding the thread's decease:

struct ThreadContainer
{
   std::mutex threadEndMutex;
   std::thread theThread;

   ThreadContainer()
     : theThread([=]()
       {
         /* do stuff */

         // if the mutex is locked, the destructor is just
         // about to join, so we let him.
         if (threadEndMutex.try_lock())
           theThread.detach();
       })
   {}

   ~ThreadContainer()
   {
     // if the mutex is locked, the thread is just about 
     // to detach itself, so no need to join.
     // if we got the mutex but the thread is not joinable, 
     // it has detached itself already.
     if (threadEndMutex.try_lock() && theThread.is_joinable())
       theThread.join();
   }
};

PS: you might not even need the call to is_joinable, because if the thread detached itself, it never unlocked the mutex and try_lock fails.

PPS: instead of the mutex, you may use std::atomic_flag:

struct ThreadContainer
{
   std::atmoic_flag threadEnded;
   std::thread theThread;

   ThreadContainer()
     : threadEnded(ATOMIC_FLAG_INIT)
     , theThread([=]()
       {
         /* do stuff */

         if (!threadEnded.test_and_set())
           theThread.detach();
       })
   {}

   ~ThreadContainer()
   {
     if (!threadEnded.test_and_set())
       theThread.join();
   }
};
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Thanks, looks like it could be a good solution. Will test it out and see how it goes. –  const_ref Nov 27 '12 at 10:30
    
Seems to work well from the initial tests. The mutex option is preferred thanks –  const_ref Nov 27 '12 at 11:19

You could define pauses/steps in your "independent" thread algorithm, and at each step you look at a global variable that helps you decide to cancel calculation and auto destroy, or to continue the calculation in your thread.

If global variable is not sufficient, i.e. if a more precise granularity is needed you should define a functor object for your thread function, this functor having a method kill(). You keep references of the functors after you have launched them as threads. And when you call the MyThreadFunctor::kill() it's sets a boolean field and this field is checked at each steps of your calculation in the functor thread-function itself..

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The second option with using a functor might work. Ill give it a try, thanks –  const_ref Nov 27 '12 at 10:23

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