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Suppose there is non-POD struct below, is the alignment taken effect? If not, what would be expected?

struct S1
{
    string s;
    int32_t i;
    double d;
} __attribute__ ((aligned (64)));

EDIT: the output of the sample code below is 64 even s is set to a long string.

int main(int argc,char *argv[])
{

        S1 s1;

        s1.s = "123451111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111";
        s1.i = 100;
        s1.d = 20.123;
        printf("%ld\n", sizeof(s1));
        return 1;
}
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what have you observed? –  Sheena Nov 27 '12 at 9:59
    
the post is updated –  Michael D Nov 27 '12 at 10:10
    
std::string stores its contents on the heap, at least in the general case, so its sizeof() is unaffected by the stored string's length. –  Angew Nov 27 '12 at 10:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Yes, the alignment takes effect in GCC.

Example code:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <cstddef>
using namespace std;


struct S1
{
    string s;
    int i;
    double d;
} __attribute__ ((aligned (64)));

struct S2
{
    string s;
    int i;
    double d;
} __attribute__ ((aligned)); // let the compiler decide

struct S3
{
    string s;
    int i;
    double d;
};

int main() {
    cout << "S1 " << sizeof(S1) << endl;
    cout << "S2 " << sizeof(S2) << endl;
    cout << "S3 " << sizeof(S3) << endl;
}

Output:

S1 64
S2 16
S3 16

Also: You have observed that S1 is non-POD. Note that std::string is allowed to store its data externally (it usually does so because the data can be of arbitrary length, so a memory buffer must be allocated dynamically).

Remember that sizeof is only calculated during compilation, it can't depend on runtime values. Specifically, you can't ever query a size of dynamically allocated memory this way.

Also remember that every element in an array is always of the same type, so of the same size too.

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Size of objects in C++ never changes. It's compile time constant. It has to be, because the compiler needs to know how much space to allocate for the object. In fact, sizeof(s1) is just alias for sizeof(S1) and no instance is involved with the later.

The std::string is a smallish object that wraps pointer to array of characters and reallocates that array to accommodate the value you set. So the string itself is stored outside the S1 object.

The __attribute__ ((aligned (64))) is not standard C++, it is GCC extension. It is honored even for non-POD objects. It simply tells the compiler to round the size of the structure up to next multiple of 64 bytes.

While it is honored on non-POD objects, I can't think of a reason to use it for one and can only think of very few reasons to use it for POD object. The default alignment is reasonable. You don't need to tweak it.

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