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I am looking for a simple way to do a task in background, then update something (on the main thread) when it completes. It's in a low level 'model' class so I can't call InvokeOnMainThread as I don't have an NSObject around. I have this method:

public void GetItemsAsync(Action<Item[]> handleResult)
{
  Item[] items=null;
  Task task=Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
  {
    items=this.CreateItems(); // May take a second or two
  });
  task.ContinueWith(delegate
  {
    handleResult(items);
  }, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
}

This seems to work OK, but

1) Is this the best (simplest) way?

2) I'm worried about the local variable:

Item{} items=null

What stops that disappearing when the method returns before the background thread completes?

Thanks.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think your method slightly violates a Single Responsibility Principle, because it doing too much.

First of all I suggest to change CreateItems to return Task instead of wrapping it in the GetItemsAsync:

public Task<Item[]> CreateItems(CancellationToken token)
{
   return Task.Factory.StartNew(() => 
     // obtaining the data...
     {});
}

CancellationToken is optional but can help you if you able to cancel this long running operation.

With this method you can remove GetItemsAsync entirely because its so simple to handle results by your client without passing this delegate:

// Somewhere in the client of your class
var task = yourClass.CreateItems(token);
task.ContinueWith(t => 
 // Code of the delegate that previously
 // passed to GetItemsAsync method
 {}, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());

Using this approach you'll get more clear code with only one responsibility. Task class itself is a perfect tool for representing asynchronous operation as a first class object. Using proposed technique you can easily mock you current implementation with a fake behavior for unit testing without changing your clients code.

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Thanks, thats better in principle. Can even remove the task variable yourClass.CreateItems(token).ContinueWith(t => { }, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext()); Pity we need"TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext()" though. I want the simplest possible API for the client so its either: 1) yourClass.GetItemsAsync(delegate(Item[] items) { // Do something with items }); or 2) yourClass.CreateItems().ContinueWith(t => { // Do something with t.Result }, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext()); So I still need the GetItemsAsync method really. –  Bbx Nov 27 '12 at 11:34
    
Yes, you're right. But GetItemsAsync is much more clear than previous solution in terms of OO principles and Task-based programming. For example, using proposed technique it would be much easier migrate to await/async features C# 5.0. In terms of OOP this solution is more simple because its not trying to invent the wheel. And do not forget a testability: in this case you can easily obtain this task from mock implementation and test any corner case of you clients code. –  Sergey Teplyakov Nov 27 '12 at 11:38

Something like this:

    public void GetItemsAsync(Action<Item[]> handleResult)
    {
        int Id = 11;
        Task<Item[]> task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => CreateItems(Id)); // May take a second or two
        task.ContinueWith(t => handleResult(t.Result), TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
    }
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Lovely, thanks. But personally, I prefer @laszlokiss88 answer - it's also just 2 lines (essentially) and seems simpler to me. –  Bbx Nov 27 '12 at 11:03

Your code looks fine.

It's a perfect example of when to use async / await if you can use C# 5, but if not, you have to write it as you have done with continuations.

The items variable is captured in your lambdas, so that's fine too.

When you write a lambda that uses an outside variable, the C# compiler creates a class that contains the variable. This is called a closure and means you can access the variable inside your lambda.

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Thanks for the fast reply :) I'd almost given up with SO after my last question about iOS APIs to find out data traffic is completely ignored. I guess it's good for some things and not others. –  Bbx Nov 27 '12 at 10:38

Here is a nicer soultion:

    public void GetItemsAsync(Action<Item[]> handleResult)
    {
        var task = Task.Factory.StartNew<Item[]>(() =>
        {
            return this.CreateItems(); // May take a second or two
        });

        task.ContinueWith(delegate
        {
            handleResult(task.Result);
        }, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that is nicer :) –  Bbx Nov 27 '12 at 10:39
    
@Bbx: you don't have Result feature because you should change the code to: Task<Item[]> task = Task.Factory.... –  Sergey Teplyakov Nov 27 '12 at 10:44
    
Thanks, yea I just realised that after I posted my comment :) –  Bbx Nov 27 '12 at 11:04

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