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What would be the command to count how many times we saw certain line by hour or by minute?

File:

Nov 26 08:50:51
Nov 26 08:50:51
Nov 26 08:51:09
Nov 26 08:51:09
Nov 26 08:51:09
Nov 26 08:51:09
Nov 26 08:51:40

Output I would like to see:

by minute:

Nov 26 08:50    2
Nov 26 08:51    5

by hour:

Nov 26 08       7
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Thank you all for your answers :) helped a lot. –  user155605 Nov 27 '12 at 11:38
1  
What if the date changed? Are you looking for output for 08:50 across all days, or for 08:50 each day? –  Ed Morton Nov 27 '12 at 14:50
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3 Answers

This can be done with uniq:

$ uniq -w9 -c file       # by hour
      7 Nov 26 08:50:51
$ uniq -w12 -c file      # by minute
      2 Nov 26 08:50:51
      5 Nov 26 08:51:09

-w compare no more than the first n characters.

-c prefix lines by the number of occurrences.

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4  
+1 very creative –  kev Nov 27 '12 at 10:16
    
"but what if days < 10 are written without leading 0 ? oh wait o_O It will work X_X ". Good job +1 –  Utopik Sep 9 '13 at 16:06
    
This is great, but I have to point out that this solution is Linux-only. The uniq in *BSD (including OSX) doesn't include a -w option. –  ghoti Mar 11 at 18:46
    
@ghoti it would be more accurate to say this solution requires GNU's implementation of uniq which can be installed on any OS. –  sudo_O Mar 11 at 19:24
    
True enough. If you install coreutils in FreeBSD, the command you'd want is actually called guniq. I add this only for posterity. The answer is still excellent. :-) –  ghoti Mar 11 at 21:19
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the awk one-liner gives you count by hour and min in one shot:

awk -F: '{h[$1]++;m[$1":"$2]++;}END{for(x in h)print x,h[x]; print "---"; for(x in m)print x,m[x]}' file

test

kent$  echo "Nov 26 08:50:51
Nov 26 08:50:51
Nov 26 08:51:09
Nov 26 08:51:09
Nov 26 08:51:09
Nov 26 08:51:09
Nov 26 08:51:40"|awk -F: '{h[$1]++;m[$1":"$2]++;}END{for(x in h)print x,h[x]; print "---"; for(x in m)print x,m[x]}'    

output

Nov 26 08 7
---
Nov 26 08:50 2
Nov 26 08:51 5
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By hour:

awk '{split($3,a,":");b[$1" "$2" "a[1]]++}END{for(i in b)print i,b[i]}' your_file

tested Below:

> awk '{split($3,a,":");b[$1" "$2" "a[1]":"a[2]]++}END{for(i in b)print i,b[i]}' temp
Nov 26 08:50 2
Nov 26 08:51 5
>

By minute:

awk '{split($3,a,":");b[$1" "$2" "a[1]":"a[2]]++}END{for(i in b)print i,b[i]}' your_file

tested below:

> awk '{split($3,a,":");b[$1" "$2" "a[1]]++}END{for(i in b)print i,b[i]}' temp
Nov 26 08 7
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