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I am trying to better understand logic and flow of exceptions. So i got to state that i really feeled lack of understanding how Perl interpretes and runs programs, which phases are involved and what happens on every phase.

For example, I'd like to understand, when are binded STD* IO and when released, what is happening with $SIG{*} things, how they are depended with execepions, how program dies, etc. I'd like to have better insight of internals mechanics.

I am looking for links or books. I prefer some material which has also visual charts involved but this is not mandatory. I'd like to see some "big picture" of whole process, then i have already possibilities to dig further if i find it necessary.

I found Chapter 18th in Programming Perl gives overview of compiling phase and i try to work it trough, but i appreciate other good sources too.

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An excellent question, by the way. :) Most original. Though I'm afraid I have no helpful answer at this time... –  LeoNerd Nov 28 '12 at 15:17

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Some alternative sources (there are not very many):

Those may be more focused to what you're looking for. I'm not sure any of them explicitly spells out the interpreter's runtime execution order, though. The first one is a better "I want to work with this stuff" book; the second two are probably good introductory references.

Some of the questions you ask are not, as far as I know, explicitly documented - the I/O question being one I can't think of a good source for in particular. Exception handling is documented very well in Try::Tiny's documentation, and it's what we use for exceptions. Signal handling is messy, but perlipc documents it pretty well. With threads, you may be stuck with unsafe signals - I generally avoid threads in favor of multiple processes unless I must have shared memory.

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You might start with these topics accessible via the perldoc program:

  Internals and C Language Interface
        perlembed           Perl ways to embed perl in your C or C++ application
        perldebguts         Perl debugging guts and tips
        perlxstut           Perl XS tutorial
        perlxs              Perl XS application programming interface
        perlxstypemap       Perl XS C/Perl type conversion tools
        perlclib            Internal replacements for standard C library functions
        perlguts            Perl internal functions for those doing extensions
        perlcall            Perl calling conventions from C
        perlmroapi          Perl method resolution plugin interface
        perlreapi           Perl regular expression plugin interface
        perlreguts          Perl regular expression engine internals

        perlapi             Perl API listing (autogenerated)
        perlintern          Perl internal functions (autogenerated)
        perliol             C API for Perl's implementation of IO in Layers
        perlapio            Perl internal IO abstraction interface

        perlhack            Perl hackers guide
        perlsource          Guide to the Perl source tree
        perlinterp          Overview of the Perl interpreter source and how it works
        perlhacktut         Walk through the creation of a simple C code patch
        perlhacktips        Tips for Perl core C code hacking
        perlpolicy          Perl development policies
        perlgit             Using git with the Perl repository
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I don't quite see how most of these pages directly relate to the question. (What does GIT have to do with SIG ;-)?) Would you mind shortening the list to the relevant topics or elaborating how e.g. perlembed relates to exception handling? –  amon Nov 27 '12 at 22:53

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