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I am in need of logic. We will be using the command "passwd" to change the passowrd of the current user. Or will be using "passwd user_name" to change the password of the corresponding user. The password related details are stored in /etc/shadow file. I think i am right upto this.

My doubts are 1. Whenever a user's password is changed, does the /etc/shadow file is updated? 2. Does the passowrd creation follow any encryption method? 3. If there is any algorithm followed, can we reverse the algorithm and find the original password for a user? 4. Is there any other file which holds details regarding the password of linux?

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closed as off topic by user714965, Oded, Paul R, sehe, Jon Lin Nov 27 '12 at 11:12

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1 Answer

1) Whenever a user's password is changed, does the /etc/shadow file is updated?

Yes, the /bin/passwd program is suid to root, so whoever runs it will run it with root's privileges, therefore able to edit the shadow file.

2) Does the passowrd creation follow any encryption method?

If you mean whether or not the password in the shadow file is obsfucated somehow, then yes, it's hashed. Probably an MD5 or SHA (or possibly blowfish) depending on the distro and age of your linux system.

3) If there is any algorithm followed, can we reverse the algorithm and find the original password for a user?

Tha algorithm is to try to guess the password, hash it, and compare it with what's in the shadow file. It's brute force and can take a long time (see "John the ripper"). Although there are certain exploitable hashes which one may be able to take advantage of, but probably only under very specific circumstances and not something you can do generally.

4) Is there any other file which holds details regarding the password of linux?

There's /etc/passwd but that doesn't hold the hash. There shouldn't be any other place where passwords are stored unless PAM is using something else like LDAP. But default installs for most distros use the shadow file.

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