Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

just wondering why duplicated behaves the way it does with NAs:

> duplicated(c(NA,NA,NA,1,2,2))
[1] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE  TRUE

where in fact

> NA == NA
[1] NA

is there a way to achieve that duplicated marks NAs as false, like this?

> duplicated(c(NA,NA,NA,1,2,2))
[1] FALSE  FALSE  FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE
share|improve this question
1  
duplicated marks the second (and third, and fourth, etc.) occurrences as duplicated, but not the first. You can use is.na() to do what you ask. – Andrie Nov 27 '12 at 11:46
    
thanks. The main question is why it makes sense to mark NAs as duplicates. – jamborta Nov 27 '12 at 11:51
up vote 11 down vote accepted

You use the argument incomparables for the function duplicated like this :

> duplicated(c(NA,NA,NA,1,2,2))
[1] FALSE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE  TRUE
> duplicated(c(NA,NA,NA,1,2,2),incomparables=NA)
[1] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE

It determines the values that cannot be compared (in this case NA) and returns FALSE for those values. See also ?duplicated

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. exactly what I was looking for. – jamborta Nov 27 '12 at 11:54
    
+1 for reading the manual :-) – Andrie Nov 27 '12 at 11:59
1  
I knew this already, I swear, I really knew this! ;) – Joris Meys Nov 27 '12 at 11:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.