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X, y, z are all numbers. Beside knowing how to check if the string is 14 chars long, I don't want to iterate each character and check if the char matches [0-9].

Are there smarter ways? No regex pls.... I'm scared of it.

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closed as too localized by Gordon, Corbin, lenik, Michael Berkowski, Nikhil Nov 28 '12 at 4:10

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5  
answer is.. REGEX! –  vlcekmi3 Nov 27 '12 at 11:46
1  
what have you tried? –  Chris Nov 27 '12 at 11:46
2  
I'm scared of questions with unnecessary constraints. :) –  Corbin Nov 27 '12 at 11:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use sscanf:

Example:

print_r( sscanf("+123-1234-1234", "+%3d-%4d-%4d") );

will output:

Array ( [0] => 123 [1] => 1234 [2] => 1234 )

This will not guarantee the validity of the input string though. A string like +1-1-1 would result in array having all three values with 1. So you still have to validate the three array values separately.

See the list of supported formats (not sure PHP supports all of these though).

But seriously, ^\+\d{3}-\d{4}-\d{4}$ is not something to be scared of. It's reasonably simple. There is much worse in Regex Land.

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Your solution would still work when passing "+1-2-3", so you'd have to check whether the lengths inside the array match as well. Also consider the fact that passing something like "+1111-2-3" will return the array ("111", "", ""). –  Mario Nov 27 '12 at 12:03
    
@Mario that's why I said the OP should check the array –  Gordon Nov 27 '12 at 12:05
    
Ah okay, thought you're referring to array length only. –  Mario Nov 27 '12 at 12:05

You don't need to be scared of regexen. A regex is just a collection of:

  1. Symbols that can be used to indicate any of a set of characters, and
  2. Operators that indicate how these symbols can be grouped.

So for example, the symbol \d matches any character from the set of digits (0-9). The operator {n} indicates repetition of the previous symbol n times.

Armed with this knowledge, let's try to define your problem in phrases:

Part 1: Match a plus, followed by 3 digits

Translated to regex, this is: \+\d{3}


Part 2: Match a hyphen, followed by 4 digits

Translated to regex, this is: -\d{4}


Part 3: Match another hyphen, followed by 4 more digits

Translated to regex, this is: -\d{4}


Altogether

Putting it all together, you have:

\+\d{3}-\d{4}-\d{4}

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part 1 is not what he's after –  Dale Nov 27 '12 at 11:52
    
+1 Sir (nothing else to say) –  Dale Nov 27 '12 at 11:54

There's no way around looking at each character. Even regular expressions will have to do it (behind the scenes). Also regular expressions are nothing to be scared of. In fact, it's actually rather easy, especially in cases like this:

$ok = preg_match('/^\+\d{3}-\d{4}-\d{4}$/', $text);

As for the actual regular Expression:

  • / are used as delimiters here, they're not that important till you want to add modifiers (like case-insensitivity).
  • ^ matches the beginning of the text (or line; depending on flags).
  • \+ is a + character. The escape is important, because + would mean "match the previous expression at least one time."
  • \d represents any number (one character).
  • {n} requires the previous expression (here: \d) to repeat exactly n times.
  • $ matches the end of the text (or line; depending on flags).

It's looking a bit more complicated and it's possibly a tad bit faster doing classic comparison:

$ok = strlen($text) == 14 && ($text[0] == '+') && is_numeric($text[1]) && is_numeric($text[2]) && ...

I'm not sure whether you refer to calling is_numeric() when talking about "check if the char matches [0-9]", but that's one of the "easiest" ways to do it I can think of.

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Regular expression is the answer.
Here is the pattern:

^\+[0-9]{3}-[0-9]{4}-[0-9]{4}$
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I think you wanted to use a $ rather than a & for the end of the line. –  Mario Nov 27 '12 at 11:55
    
@Mario: done. sorry –  lvil Nov 27 '12 at 11:59
    
Np, made worse typos. :) –  Mario Nov 27 '12 at 12:00

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