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The title really really doesn't explain things. My situation is that I would like to read a file and put the contents into a hash. Now, I want to make it clever, I want to create a loop that opens every file in a directory and put it into a hash. Problem is I don't know how to assign a name relative to the file name. eg:

hash={}  
Dir.glob(path + "*") do |datafile|
  file = File.open(datafile)
  file.each do |line|
    key, value = line.chomp("\t")
    # Problem here is that I wish to have a different
    # hash name for every file I loop through
    hash[key]=value
  end
  file.close
end

Is this possible?

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How about a hash of hashes with the first hash having keys being the filenames? Would that work? –  theIV Aug 31 '09 at 17:14
    
Ah, I see some people beat me to it below! :) –  theIV Aug 31 '09 at 17:15

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You want to dynamically create variables with the names of the files you process?

try this:

Dir.glob(path + "*") do |fileName|
  File.open(fileName) {

    # the variable `hash` and a variable named fileName will be
    # pointing to the same object... 
    hash = eval("#{fileName} = Hash.new")

    file.each do |line|
      key, value = line.chomp("\t")
      hash[key]=value
    end
  }
end

Of course you would have to make sure you rubify the filename first. A variable named "bla.txt" wouldn't be valid in ruby, neither would "path/to/bla.csv"

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+1 for solving the problem in the requested way –  bobDevil Aug 31 '09 at 17:25
    
Note though that you won't be able to access the newly created variables without eval. Also filenames containing spaces or quotes (among other things) would break this approach. –  sepp2k Aug 31 '09 at 17:25
1  
I'm not sure "solving the file the requested way" is necessarily a virtue. If the questioner knew enough to be certain what the best way was, he probably wouldn't be here. –  Chuck Aug 31 '09 at 17:36
    
@Chuck how else would you do it? Please Educate me! Thanks –  chutsu Aug 31 '09 at 17:39
    
I'm not chuck, but I would do it the way jug proposed, because a) it works with all filenames and b) you don't need eval to access the hashes afterwards. –  sepp2k Aug 31 '09 at 17:41

Can't you just do the following?

filehash = {} # after the File.open line

...
# instead of hash[key] = value, next two lines
hash[datafile] = filehash
filehash[key] = value
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You may want to use something like this:

hash[file] = {}
hash[file][key] = value
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Why don't you use a hash whose keys are the file names (in your case "datafile") and whose value are hashes in which you insert your data?

hash = Hash.new { |h, key| h[key] = Hash.new }  
Dir.glob(path + '*') do |datafile|
  next unless File.stat(datafile).file?
  File.open(datafile) do |file|
    file.each do |line|
      key, value = line.split("\t")
      puts key, value
      # Different hash name for every file is now hash[datafile]
      hash[datafile][key]=value
    end
  end
end
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2  
You can replace File.open and file.each with File.foreach(datafile) do |line| –  sepp2k Aug 31 '09 at 17:28

If you want to create a dynamic variable, you can also use #instance_variable_set (assuming that instance variables are also OK.

Dir.glob(path + "*") do |datafile|               
  file = File.open(datafile)                     
  hash = {}                                      
  file.each do |line|                            
    key, value = line.chomp("\t")                
    hash[key] = value                            
  end                                            
  instance_variable_set("@file_#{File.basename(datafile)}", hash)    
end

This only works when the filename is a valid Ruby variable name. Otherwise you would need some transformation.

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Two hashes is enough now. fileHash -> lineHash -> content.

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