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class Test
{
public:

 SOMETHING DoIt(int a)
 {
  float FLOAT = 1.2;
  int INT = 2;
  char CHAR = 'a';

  switch(a)
  {
  case 1: return INT;
  case 2: return FLOAT;
  case 3: return CHAR;
  }
 }
};


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{  
 Test obj;
 cout<<obj.DoIt(1);    
    return 0;
}

Now, using the knowledge that a = 1 implies that I need to return an integer, etc., is there anyway Doit() can return a variable of variable data type?

Essentially, with what do I replace SOMETHING ?

PS: I'm trying to find a an alternative to returning a structure/union containing these data types.

share|improve this question
1  
I wouldn't reinvent the wheel. If you don't have Boost get it now! you don't wanna mess with union and void* ;) –  AraK Aug 31 '09 at 18:01
    
Understood, but this is meant to be used for a fairly light application targeted at a broad user-base which probably wouldn't use BOOST otherwise. The boost solution is quite beautiful but if there's an alternative (or a proof that one doesn't exist), it would be nice. –  Jacob Aug 31 '09 at 18:03
4  
There is no such thing in the standard library. You either have to write your own, which is not easy by the way or you could use an external library. There is no problem with dependency on variant. You don't have to ship ALL Boost with your code. Just take a look bcp tool from boost which extracts the required headers for your code to work. –  AraK Aug 31 '09 at 18:10
3  
What do you mean in your edit? Boost is 100% legal ANSI (or ISO) C++. Of course you could define the same yourself, but you'd save yourself a lot of trouble by using boost. (Apart from this, there is no such thing as an applicaiton "too light to use Boost". The clever thing about Boost is that you can include the specific libraries you need, and nothing else. If you find Boost.Any useful, then just include that. –  jalf Aug 31 '09 at 18:32
3  
@Jacob As I understand, you have a known finite set of types. Using boost::any in this case is not recommended, because it serves other purposes where boost::variant can't serve. boost::variant is much much more efficient and safer for your case. Also, boost::any does a lot of dynamic memroy requests. In short, it is more of a dynamic type rather than a variant type. –  AraK Aug 31 '09 at 18:43
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13 Answers

up vote 24 down vote accepted

You can use boost::any or boost::variant to do what you want. I recommend boost::variant because you know the collection of types you want to return.


This is a very simple example, though you can do much more with variant. Check the reference for more examples :)

#include "boost/variant.hpp"
#include <iostream>

typedef boost::variant<char, int, double> myvariant;

myvariant fun(int value)
{
 if(value == 0)
 {
  return 1001;
 }
 else if(value  == 1)
 {
  return 3.2;
 }
  return 'V';
}

int main()
{
 myvariant v = fun(0);
 std::cout << v << std::endl;

 v = fun(1);
 std::cout << v << std::endl;

 v = fun(54151);
 std::cout << v << std::endl;
}

The output:

1001
3.2
V

I would use boost::variant instead of a union because you can't use non-POD types inside union. Also, boost::any is great if you don't know the type you are dealing with. Otherwise, I would use boost::variant because it is much more efficient and safer.


Answering the edited question: If you don't want to ship Boost with your code, take a look at bcp. The description of bcp from the same link:

The bcp utility is a tool for extracting subsets of Boost, it's useful for Boost authors who want to distribute their library separately from Boost, and for Boost users who want to distribute a subset of Boost with their application.

bcp can also report on which parts of Boost your code is dependent on, and what licences are used by those dependencies.

share|improve this answer
    
Beat me to it. –  Jonas Aug 31 '09 at 17:27
    
To make this a better answer for didactic purposes, could you include links to the reference pages for boost::any and boost::variant? Thanks! –  A. Levy Aug 31 '09 at 17:36
    
Arak, could you add the bcp comment to your answer? –  Jacob Aug 31 '09 at 18:24
1  
@Jacob I haven't really used bcp before because Boost is always my in my toolbox. I ll add a link to it though :) –  AraK Aug 31 '09 at 18:34
add comment

C++ is a strongly-typed language, and has no concept of an unknown type. You could try using boost::any, which can (sort of) specify any type. I would question the design of your function, however.

share|improve this answer
1  
Jacob- if you describe what you're actually trying to accomplish, we may be able to suggest a better approach. –  luke Aug 31 '09 at 18:15
3  
@Jacob The quality of the answers you get here is directly proportionate to the detail of the question. –  anon Aug 31 '09 at 18:39
2  
@Neil While I understand there is a code smell here. I can't understand how would you question the design without knowing the design in the first place. I used boost::variant when building a lexer for one of my college classes, and it was the right tool in my opinion. Even if C++ is a strongly typed language that doesn't mean in my opinion it is wrong all the time to use variant or any from boost. –  AraK Aug 31 '09 at 18:57
2  
@Arak I said I would question his design - he doesn't seem to want to answer, however. Question means exactly that - "Please explain why you think this is a good solution?" All designs should be questioned, all the time. –  anon Aug 31 '09 at 19:13
2  
All these answer's could be stuck in a local minimum, where the real answers lies elsewhere. While boost::any or boost::variant may be the best way to return varying types, returning varying types might not be the best way to solve your specific problem. –  GManNickG Aug 31 '09 at 20:05
show 14 more comments

If you know type at compile time you could use templates. If type depends on run-time, then using templates is not an option.

class Test
{
  template<int> struct Int2Type {};
  template<>    struct Int2Type<1> { typedef int value_type; };
  template<>    struct Int2Type<2> { typedef float value_type; };
  template<>    struct Int2Type<3> { typedef char value_type; };

public:
  template<int x> typename Int2Type<x>::value_type DoIt() {}; // error if unknown type used
  template<> typename Int2Type<1>::value_type DoIt<1>() { return 2; };
  template<> typename Int2Type<2>::value_type DoIt<2>() { return 1.2f; };
  template<> typename Int2Type<3>::value_type DoIt<3>() { return 'a'; };
};

int main()
{
  Test obj;
  cout << obj.DoIt<2>(); 
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is a beautifully simple solution if the numbers are known at compile-time. +1 –  sbi Aug 31 '09 at 20:58
add comment

Use boost::any:

boost::any DoIt(int a)
{
    float FLOAT = 1.2;
    int INT = 2;
    char CHAR = 'a';

    switch(a)
    {
    case 1: return boost::any(INT);
    case 2: return boost::any( FLOAT);
    case 3: return boost::any( CHAR);
    }
}
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add comment

EDIT: boost::any using bcp (thanks AraK) seems to be the best solution to date but is it possible to prove (to some extent) that there exists no ANSI C++ solution to this problem?

You seem a bit confused about the terminology here.

First, let's call it ISO C++, shall we? It was standardized by ISO in 1998, and since then, that is what people have referred to when talking about "standard C++". Now, what do you mean by an "ANSI C++ solution"?

  • A solution that compiles cleanly using only ANSI (or ISO) C++? If so, Boost is the ANSI C++ solution
  • A solution already implemented in the ANSI C++ standard library? If so then no, no such solution exists (and there is no "proof", other than "go read through the language standard and see if you can find such a class. If you can't, it isn't there".
  • A solution you could implement yourself using only ANSI C++. Then the answer is "yes, you could go copy the source code from Boost".

I can't imagine what kind of "proof" you'd be looking for. C++ is a document in prose form. It is not a mathematical equation. It can not be "proven", except by saying "go read the standard". Proving that something is defined in the language or in the standard library is easy -- simply point out where in the standard it is described. But proving that something isn't there is basically impossible -- except by enumerating every single sentence of the standard, and document that none of them describe what you're looking for. And I doubt you'll find anyone willing to do that for you.

Anyway, the correct standard C++ solution is to use Boost. It is not a heavy-weight solution. Boost is pretty lightweight in that you can include exactly the bits you need, with no dependencies on the rest of the library collection.

From what you've described (a light application for a broad user base), there is zero reason not to use Boost. It can simplify your code and reduce the number of bugs caused by attempting to reinvent the wheel. When distributing the compiled executable, it has zero cost. The Boost.Any library is, like much of Boost, header-only, and is simply compiled into your executable. No separate libraries have to be distributed.

There is nothing to be gained by trying to reinvent the wheel. Your executable will be no smaller or more efficient, but it will be more buggy.

And I'm willing to bet that your home-brewed solution will not be ANSI C++. It will rely on some form of undefined behavior. If you want an ANSI-C++ solution, your best bet is Boost.

share|improve this answer
    
I suspect that they meant without relying on boxing the returned value, given their PS. –  Boojum Aug 31 '09 at 18:56
    
perhaps, but if so, the answer is wonderfully simple "nope, doesn't exist". Although the request for "proof" still puzzles me. –  jalf Aug 31 '09 at 19:30
    
[This][1] is an example of a proof showing that this person's answer will not work. IMO, a proof is just a collection of proven statements, used to prove the question at hand. The proof I was asking for could've been the part of the documentation you keep talking about which explicitly does not allow this in any form (which I think is hard to find). [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/1358427/… –  Jacob Aug 31 '09 at 19:49
    
And I was looking for a simple answer (like most of the alternatives posted here) which I could've missed. If that's impossible, and boost::any is the best alternative, then that's fine by me, I'll use bcp and add it (like I've stated in my post). –  Jacob Aug 31 '09 at 19:50
    
Why would the language specification describe what is not defined? It tells you what you can do in the language. If something is not mentioned in the standard, then it is not part of the language.In general, the only way to show that something can not be done in the language is by failing to find it in the specification. The standard does not say "no variant type exists", it simply describes the types that do exist. You sound like you want a mathematical proof, which isn't really possible or meaningful in this context. –  jalf Aug 31 '09 at 20:32
show 10 more comments

The usual way to achieve something like this is C, which doesn't always work in C++, is with a union and a type field:

enum SomeType { INT, FLOAT, CHAR };
struct Something
{
    SomeType type;
    union
    {
        int i;
        float f;
        char c;
    };
};

Something DoIt(int a)
{
    Something s;
    switch (a)
    {
      case 1:
        s.type = INT;
        s.i = 2;
        break;
      case 2:
        s.type = FLOAT;
        s.f = 1.2;
        break;
      case 3:
        s.type = CHAR;
        s.c = 'a';
        break;
      default:
        // ???
    }
    return s;
}

This doesn't work in C++ when one of the possible value types is a class with a non-trivial constructor, because it wouldn't always be clear which constructor should be called. Boost.Variant uses a more complex version of this approach to provide this kind of construct for any value types in C++.

share|improve this answer
    
Alternative to a union/struct –  Jacob Aug 31 '09 at 17:58
add comment

You could use a struct containing a void* pointing to the value you want returned along with a size_t that indicates the size of the object being returned. Something like this:

struct Something {
    void *value;
    size_t size;
};

Remember that the void* should point to a value residing on the heap (i.e. dynamically allocated using new or malloc) and the caller should take care of freeing the allocated object.

Having said that, I think it's a bad idea overall.

Edit: You may also want to consider including a flag indicating what was returned in the above structure so that the caller can make sense of it, unless the caller knows what type to expect.

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If the user knows what is put in, you could use a template to fix this. If not, I can't think of any solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you be more specific? The only variable here is the function return type. –  Jacob Aug 31 '09 at 17:25
2  
You can't use templates because the return type depends on run-time condition. –  AraK Aug 31 '09 at 17:25
    
@AraK: Only if the int isn't known at compile-time. If it is, you can. See stackoverflow.com/questions/1358427/… –  sbi Aug 31 '09 at 20:59
add comment

You could use a union:

typedef union {
  int i;
  float f;
  char c;
} retType;

retType DoIt(int a){
  retType ret;

  float FLOAT = 1.2;
  int INT = 2;
  char CHAR = 'a';

  switch(a)
  {
    case 1: ret.i = INT; break;
    case 2: ret.f = FLOAT; break;
    case 3: ret.c = CHAR; break;
  }
  return ret;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
He wants an alternative to unions. See the P.S. at the end of the question. –  A. Levy Aug 31 '09 at 17:38
add comment

The Adobe Source Libraries also has adobe::any_regular_t, which allows you to store any type as long as it models the Regular concept. You would wrap your return value much the same way you would with boost::any. (There is also documentation on the linked page as to how adobe::any_regular_t differs from boost::any -- of course the type you pick should depend on the requirements of your code.)

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You could pass by reference instead and be typesave and check if it worked at the same time, would not involve any additional library either (your kind of ansi C++ solution):

bool DoIt (int i, int & r1)
{
  if (i==1) {r1 = 5; return true}
  return false;
}

bool DoIt (int i, double & r2)
{
  if (i==2) {r2 = 1.2; return true}
  return false;
}

...

I find this solution often more clean in terms of design. It's unfortunate that funciton signatures don't allow multiple types as return types, but this way you can pass anything.

share|improve this answer
    
This is part of an application where it is essential to use it directly without creating a new variable (to which we'd pass the reference). –  Jacob Aug 31 '09 at 18:18
add comment

I think the problem is about this function design. Have you tried overloading?

class Test
{

public:

int DoIt(int a) {

  int INT = 2;
   return INT;

} 

float DoIt(float a) {

float FLOAT = 1.2; 
return FLOAT;

} 

char DoIt(char a) {

char CHAR = 'a'; 
return CHAR;

} 

};


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{       
    Test obj;

//....

switch(a)
case 1: 
    cout<< obj.DoIt(1);    
break;

case 2:
cout<< obj.DoIt(1.01);   
break;

case 3:
cout<< obj.DoIt("1");   
break;

    return 0;
}

Inside DoIt functions you can place more code and make them call other functions for not repeating code.

share|improve this answer
    
The varying element here is the function return type and not the arguments. –  Jacob Aug 31 '09 at 18:40
add comment

SOMETHING = void*

You have to cast the returned value, so you have to know what is returned.

void* DoIt(int a)
    {
        float FLOAT = 1.2;
        int INT = 2;
        char CHAR = 'a';

        switch(a)
        {
        case 1: return &INT;
        case 2: return &FLOAT;
        case 3: return &CHAR;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Just remember that the variables FLOAT, INT and CHAR will go out of scope once the function returns. I am not sure what the consequences are. –  Agnel Kurian Aug 31 '09 at 17:43
2  
-1 for returning addresses of local values. In addition a void* is rather useless if you don't know what type it actually refers to. –  UncleBens Aug 31 '09 at 17:44
    
@Agnel: The consequences are severe. –  sbi Aug 31 '09 at 21:01
    
The consequences are undefined, so nothing to severe. –  GManNickG Aug 31 '09 at 22:06
    
Good catch uncle ben. –  Jay Sep 1 '09 at 16:30
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