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I am following this link: http://codebetter.com/jpboodhoo/2007/10/15/the-static-gateway-pattern/ to understand the Gateway pattern.

The author shares a sample of the "gateway" logger class and related interfaces:

public class Log
{
    private static ILogFactory logFactory;

    public static void InitializeLogFactory(ILogFactory logFactory)
    {
        Log.logFactory = logFactory;
    }

    public void InformationalMessage(string informationalMessage)
    {
        logFactory.Create().InformationalMessage(informationalMessage);
    }
}

public interface ILogFactory
{
    ILog Create();
}

public interface ILog
{
    void InformationalMessage(string message);
}

This is the calling API

public class Calculator
{                
public int Add(int number1,int number2)
{
Log.InformationalMessage("About to add two numbers");            
return number1 + number2;
}
}

I am unable to understand where the initialization of the concrete logging class happens here. What is the entry point of the gateway?

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1  
at the bottom of the article, the author says: "In completion here is a quick implementation of an ILogFactory/ILog pair that will output log messages to the console (I’ll leave it up to you to come up with a more testable implementation of the following 2 classes):" –  Ric Nov 27 '12 at 13:41
1  
@Ric, Thanks for pointing this out. Finally, I get it. I kinda refused to go ahead in the article before figuring out that piece. –  TheSilverBullet Nov 27 '12 at 14:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

With regards to concrete implementation of the Interfaces, there are examples at the bottom of the article which show how it can be implemented.

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The way the example is laid out is a bit deceiving, as the calling of the API is more relevant to the first example. Note the test cases that follow where the init is called. In addition you would have a Log instance which the author does not have, being a bit more symbolic in the example. The other option is a static Log class.

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Exactly! Clearly the InformationalMessage method needs an instance of the Log class. I was wondering how the author did not get build error. It would be perfect if you can help me with the correct calling API. Losing my head trying to figure that out :| –  TheSilverBullet Nov 27 '12 at 13:51
1  
There is an implementation of the classes at the bottom of the article! –  Ric Nov 27 '12 at 13:52
    
@Ric, How did I miss that? Going through it... –  TheSilverBullet Nov 27 '12 at 14:12

EDIT: Disregard this please, it is incorrect. Only reason I am not deleting is so my comment responding to the person who pointed it out can stay on.

Note that the 'Log` class has static constructor:

public static void InitializeLogFactory(ILogFactory logFactory)
    {
        Log.logFactory = logFactory;
    }

The first time the Log class is loaded (upon first reference), the static constructor will run, initializing its logFactory with a concrete realization of the factory.

Then, every time InformationalMessage is called, the concrete factory is used to create an instance of a logger to log the message.

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That's not the constructor, that's a publicly exposed static method. Constructor name and class name should match, at least in C#. –  Aaron McIver Nov 27 '12 at 13:48
    
Sorry, quite right... its way to early for me in at the moment. I have to admit, when I read his article, I thought it was far too much complexity for no real gain. If you are addicted to naming patterns, the relevant pattern here should be the service broker pattern. –  SAJ14SAJ Nov 27 '12 at 13:52
    
Service broker pattern. Interesting. Will have to check it out. In this case, InitializeLogFactory will not be run unless it is explicitly called right? –  TheSilverBullet Nov 27 '12 at 13:59
    
@TheSilverBullet That is correct. –  Aaron McIver Nov 27 '12 at 14:39

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