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assuming the following simple code:

for(int i=0; i < 1000; i++)
{
  cout << "Outer i: " << i << endl;
  for(int i=0; i < 12; i++)
  {
    cout << "Inner i:" << i << endl;
  }
}

Works very nice. The same variable name in both loops used and the output is fine.

Do I understand it right that both variables are created on stack, and when the outer loop comes to the new inner loop, a new "namespace" (maybe the wrong name..) is created? But why is it overwritten? If I choose another name for the variable in inner loop I can also access the i from outer loop.

A bit confused I am.

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8  
read a good C++ book you must –  user1773602 Nov 27 '12 at 14:27
    
This is actually a new variable but has the same name. In different scopes, this is OK. But note that it is not possible to refer to the outer i from the inner loop. –  Maroun Maroun Nov 27 '12 at 14:28
    
possible duplicate of Scope ambiguity in nested if –  ecatmur Nov 27 '12 at 14:29
    
though it works .. it is not encouraged method! –  InfantPro'Aravind' Nov 27 '12 at 14:31
1  
I noticed this in some other persons code and built a simple code myself to check if it compiles correctly, which it does and works. Wouldn't write such code myself but always try to understand what happens instead of just accepting what I see –  Stefan Nov 27 '12 at 14:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

"Namespace" is kinda close.. but it is more about scope. The inner i hides/surpresses the outer i. You could think of another example:

{ 
 int i=0; //outer scope i.
 {
   int i =0; //this hides the outer scope i.. I can't use outer i here

 }
  i =1 ; //inner i is out of scope.. outer i is set to 1
}
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I believe the term is hides, more than elides. Elides means omit and in the standard as far as I remember is only used to describe the suppression of copies under some circumstances. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 27 '12 at 14:33
    
Mmn, I would change it from elide to hide... some tutorials I read ages ago referred to it as such. –  Lews Therin Nov 27 '12 at 14:33
    
most compilers have a switch to warn about "shadowing" of variables it is generally a good idea to be warned about this. Especially if working with legacy code full of monster methods and poor practice... –  mark Nov 27 '12 at 14:38

Your understanding is correct. The code is technically valid. However, this practice has many problems and is therefore a bad idea.

Each for loop has a separate scope associated with it. The variable declared in the inner loop shadows the variable declared in the outer loop. There is no way to access the outer i from the inner loop.

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2  
I noticed this in some other persons code and built a simple code myself to check if it compiles correctly, which it does and works. Wouldn't write such code myself but always try to understand what happens instead of just accepting what I see. –  Stefan Nov 27 '12 at 14:30

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