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Usually when I do git pull or git status it automatically fetches and merge the data from the remote branch, and show the local commits that can be pushed on that branch.

A new branch have been created at work and when I do like I usually do, I have the following:

$ git st
# On branch mybranch-s48
# Changes not staged for commit:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#   modified:   src/main/java/com/xxx/batch/bo/utils/DisplayTagUtils.java
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")



$ git commit -am "Test git commit"
[mybranch-s48 28813a3] Test git commit
 1 files changed, 2 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)


$ git st
# On branch mybranch-s48
nothing to commit (working directory clean)


$ git pull
You asked me to pull without telling me which branch you
want to merge with, and 'branch.mybranch-s48.merge' in
your configuration file does not tell me, either. Please
specify which branch you want to use on the command line and
try again (e.g. 'git pull <repository> <refspec>').
See git-pull(1) for details.

If you often merge with the same branch, you may want to
use something like the following in your configuration file:

    [branch "mybranch-s48"]
    remote = <nickname>
    merge = <remote-ref>

    [remote "<nickname>"]
    url = <url>
    fetch = <refspec>

Normally the "pull" doesn't need anything, and the status would show me I have 1 commit to push.

I can still use git pull origin mybranch-s48 or git push origin mybranch-s48.

This branch is not in the list Local branches configured for 'git pull': but only in the list Local refs configured for 'git push': when doing git remote show origin

Can someone help me please

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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try setting the upstream branch:

git branch mybranch-s48 --set-upstream origin/mybranch-s48

Usually, when you check out a branch that exists on the remote but not in your local repo, a local copy is made to "track" the remote branch. If you created your local branch some other way, and Git doesn't already know it should be tracking the remote branch, then you'll need to tell it so, using --set-upstream.

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thanks it worked, but can you explain why this time it wasn't configured by default, why it seems to be for other branches I have used? –  Sebastien Lorber Nov 27 '12 at 14:50
    
@SebastienLorber What steps did you take to create your local copy of mybranch-s48? Did it already exist remotely? –  Will Vousden Nov 27 '12 at 14:52
    
normally it did (don't know how to check but perhaps it didn't yet...) and i did git checkout mybranch-s48 –  Sebastien Lorber Nov 27 '12 at 14:56
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