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The goal of the following bit of code is to toggle a group of radio buttons named "knowsnumberofpeople". Unfortunately, after the first message box shows up and the radio buttons change correctly, jQuery goes back and toggles everything to the original state.

Why does jQuery go back on previous items in the collection?

Code:

 <script type="text/javascript">
        $("input[name='numberofpeople']").change(function() {
            $("input[name='knowsnumberofpeople']").each(function() {
            alert("Hi there.");                
                if ($(this).attr("checked") === "Checked") {
                    $(this).attr("checked", "");
                }
                else {
                    $(this).attr("checked", "Checked");
                }
            }
            );
        }
        );
    </script>

Edit

To answer questions and comments...

No, the two things are different. One radio button has a textbox and the other one doesn't. Both radio buttons all have the same name. The radio buttons are named knowsnumberofpoeple and the textbox is named numberofpeople. They radio buttons have the same ID, thanks to ASP .NET MVC (I tried setting their id through htmlAttribute, didn't work out).

They go to their original state.

There are no events bound to the knowsnumberofpeople control.

Why not read the value and set it?

I tried and it doesn't work:

$("input[name='knowsnumberofpeople']").val = true;

karbassi's solution doesn't work either. It just toggles the second radio button (the one without a textbox).

More Code

<form action="/ReserveSpace/ExpectedAttendance" method="post">
    <fieldset class="smallform">
        <input id="knowsnumberofpeople" name="knowsnumberofpeople" type="radio" value="True" />
        <input id="numberofpeople" name="numberofpeople" type="text" value="" />

        <label for="numberofpeople">
            (e.g. 20)</label><br />
        <input checked="checked" id="knowsnumberofpeople" name="knowsnumberofpeople" type="radio" value="False" />
        <label>
            I'm not sure.
        </label>
        <p>
            <input type="submit" value="Next" accesskey="N" /></p>
    </fieldset>
    </form>
share|improve this question
    
Is there a typo here? Are 'numberofpeople' and 'knowsnumberofpeople' the same? –  bryanbcook Aug 31 '09 at 18:22
1  
Is it possible your knowsnumberofpeople has an event that causes the numberofpeople to change, causing a feedback? –  Sean Aug 31 '09 at 18:24
1  
we need the markup really. There must be something not obvious from the above –  redsquare Aug 31 '09 at 18:52
    
does it just put them back to the original state, or does it put you into an infinite loop? Leave the page running for a while, see if your machine explodes. –  idrumgood Aug 31 '09 at 18:54
1  
Do you have any events bound to your "knowsnumberofpeople" inputs? –  Joel Potter Aug 31 '09 at 19:27
add comment

3 Answers 3

If you're checking to see if a checkbox/radio button is checked, use

$(this).is(":checked")

Second, your code has a major logic bug. Only one radio button can be checked at any given time, but your code goes through and "checks" every radio button that isn't already checked.

So, no matter what you do, the last option should be checked, unless it's already checked, in which case none of the options would be checked.

Shouldn't you just be reading a value from numberofpeople, then select the appropriate radio button that way?

share|improve this answer
add comment

Try this:

<script type="text/javascript">
   $("input[name='numberofpeople']").change(function() {
      $("input[name='knowsnumberofpeople']").each(function() {
         if ($(this + ":checked").length > 0) {
            $(this).attr("checked", "");
         } else {
            $(this).attr("checked", "Checked");
         }
      });
   });
</script>

Basically, you are using the $('input:checked') selector in jQuery.

ON SECOND THOUGHT, USE THIS

<script type="text/javascript">
   var tog = false; // or true if they are checked on load 

   $("input[name='numberofpeople']").change(function() {
      $("input[name=knowsnumberofpeople]").attr("checked", !tog);
      tog = !tog; 
   });
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
this is not a string, and I don't think it will evaluate to "input" in the above code. It'll probably evaluate to "[Object object]" giving you a selector that looks like "[Object object]:checked". Clearly not what you want. –  Joel Potter Aug 31 '09 at 19:26
    
Good point. That's why I think ze should be using the second option I wrote. –  karbassi Aug 31 '09 at 19:30
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Solution, found thanks to http://www.electrictoolbox.com/jquery-get-set-form-values/

        $("input[name='numberofpeople']").change(updateRadioButtons);

    function updateRadioButtons() {
        if ($("input[name='numberofpeople']").val() == "") {
            $("input[name=knowsnumberofpeople]")[1].checked = true;
        }
        else {
            $("input[name=knowsnumberofpeople]")[0].checked = true;
        }
    }

Thanks for everyone's help and I've up-voted answers that were particularly helpful.

share|improve this answer
    
Would I be right in thinking that you have multiple inputs named numberofpeople? if so, you may have sidestepped an issue with that updateRadioButtons code. –  Tristan Warner-Smith Sep 1 '09 at 17:37
    
There's only one input named numberofpeople. –  Zian Choy Sep 1 '09 at 21:53
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