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I am looking for filtering the elements in a list.

Say for example I have a list:

listA = ['banana', 'apple', 'appleRed', 'melon_01', 'appleGreen', 'Orange', 'melon_03']
listB = ['apple', 'melon']

Now i need to compare the list and produce a list which contains only element name starts with listB.

The result should be:

listResult = ['apple', 'appleRed', 'melon_01', 'appleGreen', 'melon_03']

I can do this in 2 for loop and using a if loop comparision. like,

for item in listA:
    for fruit in listB:
        if item.startswith(fruit):
            listResult.append(item)
            break

However, I am wondering is there any short cut available for this operation as this may take more time for the big list comparision.

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3 Answers 3

Use list comprehension and the any generator:

[item for item in listA if any(item.startswith(fruit) for fruit in listB)]

Or, as correctly suggested by @DSM:

[item for item in listA if item.startswith(tuple(listB))]

which is way faster than the first solution, and almost as fast as the regex solution proposed by @Iguananaut (but more compact and readable):

In [1]: %timeit [item for item in listA if any(item.startswith(fruit) for fruit in listB)]
100000 loops, best of 3: 4.31 us per loop

In [2]: %timeit [item for item in listA if item.startswith(tuple(listB))]
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.56 us per loop

In [3]: %timeit filter(regex.match, listA)
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.39 us per loop
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3  
.startswith also accepts a tuple of strings as an argument, so if item.startswith(tuple(listB)) will work as well. –  DSM Nov 27 '12 at 15:11
1  
Just to be clear, while it's cute to know that .startswith accepts a tuple, any is far more widely applicable, and so it's the important one to know and use for these patterns. –  DSM Nov 27 '12 at 15:22
    
Thanks. The second solution looks great –  karpanai Nov 27 '12 at 15:24
    
Nice--I never even knew that .startswith accepts a tuple. –  Iguananaut Nov 27 '12 at 16:29

If there are relatively few items in your listB you could make it into a regular expression fairly efficiently:

import re
regex = re.compile(r'^(?:%s)' % '|'.join(listB))
filter(regex.match, listA)

That's the first thing that came to my mind but I think others will have other ideas.

Note, the other answers using list comprehensions are of course perfectly fine and reasonable. I thought you were wondering if there was a way to make it slightly faster. Again should stress this solution might not always be faster for a general case, but in this case it is by slightly:

In [9]: %timeit [item for item in listA if any(item.startswith(fruit) for fruit in listB)]
100000 loops, best of 3: 8.17 us per loop

In [10]: %timeit filter(regex.match, listA)
100000 loops, best of 3: 2.62 us per loop
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I agree with you –  karpanai Nov 27 '12 at 15:22
listResult = [ i for i in listA if any( i.startsWith( j ) for j in listB ) ]
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