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I'm currently wondering if there is a way to find out the number of bytes used by a particular field value (which may or may not be longer than 4000 characters) in a SQL query.

dbms_lob.getLength() returns the number of characters not bytes and I can't just do a straight multiplication since there are a variable number of bytes per character in this character set. Briefly wondered about using dbms_lob.converttoblob() but this appears to need PL/SQL and I need to do this directly in a single query.

Now stumped! Any help much appeciated...

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2 Answers 2

Use Oracle function LENGTHB() to get this result. there is a way around convert CLOB to BLOB by using DBMS_LOB.CONVERTTOBLOB and use DBMS_LOB.GET_LENGTH(). this is will return no of bytes.

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Thanks Alvaro with the formatting of the answer :) –  Ajith Sasidharan Nov 27 '12 at 16:23
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Hi, thanks for the reply but unfortunately lengthb doesn't seem to work on CLOBs... –  Steve Chambers Nov 27 '12 at 16:31
    
... and fixing the typo in function name ;-) –  Álvaro G. Vicario Nov 27 '12 at 16:55
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Update: As I haven't received a satisfactory answer yet I'm currently resorting to using dbms_lob.getlength() to get the number of characters and then multiplying by 2. This is based on a comment here about the AL32UTF8 character set:

https://forums.oracle.com/forums/thread.jspa?threadID=2133623

"Almost all characters require 2 bytes of storage with a handful of special characters requiring 4 bytes of storage."

Haven't verified how true this is but the person sounded like they knew what they were talking about so am currently using it as a "best guess".

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