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Why does this strncpy() implementation crashes on second run, while the first run works ok?

strncpy

Copy characters from string Copies the first n characters of source to destination. If the end of the source C string (which is signaled by a null-character) is found before n characters have been copied, destination is padded with zeros until a total of n characters have been written to it.

No null-character is implicitly appended at the end of destination if source is longer than n (thus, in this case, destination may not be a null terminated C string).

char *strncpy(char *src, char *destStr, int n)
{
    char *save = destStr; //backing up the pointer to the first destStr char
    char *strToCopy = src; //keeps [src] unmodified

    while (n > 0)
    {
        //if [n] > [strToCopy] length (reaches [strToCopy] end),
        //adds n null-teminations to [destStr]
        if (strToCopy = '\0') 
            for (; n > 0 ; ++destStr)
                *destStr = '\0';

        *destStr = *strToCopy;
        strToCopy++;
        destStr++;
        n--;

        //stops copying when reaches [dest] end (overflow protection)
        if (*destStr == '\0')
            n = 0; //exits loop
    }

    return save;
}

/////////////////////////////////////////////

int main()
{
    char st1[] = "ABC";
    char *st2;
    char *st3 = "ZZZZZ";
    st2 = (char *)malloc(5 * sizeof(char));


    printf("Should be: ZZZZZ\n");
    st3 = strncpy(st1, st3, 0);
    printf("%s\n", st3);

    printf("Should be: ABZZZZZ\n");
    st3 = strncpy(st1, st3, 2);
    printf("%s\n", st3);

    printf("Should be: ABCZZZZZ\n");
    st3 = strncpy(st1, st3, 3);
    printf("%s\n", st3);

    printf("Should be: ABC\n");
    st3 = strncpy(st1, st3, 4);
    printf("%s\n", st3);

    printf("Should be: AB\n");
    st2 = strncpy(st1, st2, 2);
    printf("%s\n", st2);

    printf("Should be: AB\n");
    st2 = strncpy(st1, st2, 4);
    printf("%s\n", st2);
}
share|improve this question
2  
Does this even compile? strnacpy is undefined. – netcoder Nov 27 '12 at 16:03
2  
Please don't put the question in the title only, put it in the body of the actual question together with some descriptive text. – Joachim Pileborg Nov 27 '12 at 16:03
    
Because you run out of allocated memory. First try is to reserve more space for st2 string – George Gaál Nov 27 '12 at 16:04
    
@netcoder typo, sorry. – tempy Nov 27 '12 at 16:05
1  
@GeorgeGaál strncpy()'s "feature" of tail-filling the target buffer with 0's out to 'n' on an under-copy is probably second only to the failure to place a 0 on exact-copy or over-copy in terms of "didn't know it did that" factor. It still amazes me how many people use that function without knowing either of those features. – WhozCraig Nov 27 '12 at 16:10
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You get a segmentation fault because

char *st3 = "ZZZZZ";

the destination is a string literal. String literals must not be modified, and often they are stored in write-protected memory. So when you call

strncpy(st1, st3, n);

with an n > 0, you are trying to modify the string literal and that results in a crash (not necessarily, but usually).

In the copy loop, you have forgotten to dereference strToCopy

if (strToCopy = '\0')

and wrote = instead of ==, so strToCopy is set to NULL, causing further dereferences of strToCopy to invoke undefined behaviour.

share|improve this answer
    
...and string literals are const when written in this way. – ThiefMaster Nov 27 '12 at 16:04
    
Agree. Because original string isn't modified, the real function prototype must be char *strncpy(const char *src, char *destStr, int n) – George Gaál Nov 27 '12 at 16:08
    
@ThiefMaster: They're not const (in C, but are in C++), although modifying them is UB. – netcoder Nov 27 '12 at 16:14
    
Then how does it modify it on the first run? what should I do in order to be able to modify the string? Thank you for the help. – tempy Nov 27 '12 at 16:17
    
@tempy: You need to allocate it, either as an array (on the stack) or using malloc (on the heap). – netcoder Nov 27 '12 at 16:19

I don't think you want this:

if (strToCopy = '\0') 

Instead, what you probably meant to do is this:

if (*strToCopy == '\0') 

In general, using yoda conditions will save you much headache from comparison-vs-assignment conflation issues:

if ('\0' == *strToCopy)
share|improve this answer
1  
Better than using nasty syntax, always compile with warnings enabled, e.g. gcc -Wall ... - this will catch dumb mistakes like = instead of ==. – Paul R Nov 27 '12 at 16:08
    
@PaulR Do you find Yoda Conditions to be nasty syntax? (If so, how come?) The problem with using gcc -Wall is that some legacy C code is written with legitimate assignment operations in the test conditions – sampson-chen Nov 27 '12 at 16:13
    
Yes, the Yoda syntax hack is confusing for beginners, less readable/natural and these days unnecessary. For legacy code that generates warnings then these warnings can be be preferably fixed or at least disabled on a per-file basis as necessary. – Paul R Nov 27 '12 at 16:15
1  
@PaulR -Wall -Werror if thats the case. Shoot the messenger =P – WhozCraig Nov 27 '12 at 16:19
while (n > 0)
    {
        //if [n] > [strToCopy] length (and reaches [strToCopy] end),
        //adds n null-teminations to [destStr]

        *destStr = *strToCopy;
        //stops copying when reaches [dest] end (overflow protection)
        if (*destStr == '\0')
            break; //exits loop
        strToCopy++;
        destStr++;
        n--;


    }
if (*destStr != '\0') *destStr = '\0';

In the main:

printf("Should be: ZZZZZ\n");
    st3 = strncpy(st1, st3, 0);
    printf("%s\n", st3);

this wrong because the length you want to copy is 0 so you will not obtain ZZZZZ

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