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Because I’m relative new to OOP / C# i don’t know the right pattern to solve this:

I have to build a plugin architecture for different IO Providers. The host reads the needed Provider name / type from the config, then it should the provider instantiate and parameterize.

So I have basically this interfaces:

public interface IoProvider //(Base interface, all Providers implements this)
{
    void Initialize();
    void Execute();
}

public interface IFileProvider: IoProvider
{
    string PropertyA { get; set; }
}

public interface ISmtpProvider : IoProvider
{
    string PropertyB { get; set; }
    string PropertyC { get; set; }
}

As you see the derived, specialized IO Providers have different additional parameter properties which the base interface doesn’t have. To avoid if/then/else or switch statements my idea was to use a factory pattern.

But if i understand this correctly it doesn’t solve my if/then/else problem because on the client I have to check the derived type to supply the correct parameters.

So the program flow on the Host would be something like this: Host reads config, gets Name/Type of needed Provider Host calls Factory and gets the Provider

But how avoid this - is there a pattern to solve this without if/then/else?

If (provider == typeOf(IFileProvider))  
PropertyA = value  
else if (provider == typeOf(ISmtpProvider))  
PropertyB = value  
PropertyC = value  
Elseif …
share|improve this question
    
what's wrong with if/else? –  Sam I am Nov 27 '12 at 16:19
    
I like maps for this type of thing but factories often have big switch statements. Why do you feel the need to remove it? –  Conrad Frix Nov 27 '12 at 16:19
2  
i learned this is bad coding style. there are not only 2 types of providers, at the moment there a 5 diffrent providers. –  Radioactive Nov 27 '12 at 16:22
    
@Radioactive why is it bad style? What is the problem that trying to be avoided? How is a configuration file different in its impacts in practice than a big switch statement? –  Conrad Frix Nov 28 '12 at 16:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You can replace switch statement with polymorphism. Just allow each provider to configure itself from config. This is a best option, because each provider knows which values to look for:

provider.Configure();

This method should exist in base interface:

public interface IoProvider 
{
    void Initialize();
    void Execute();
    void Configure();
}

And each provider implement it:

public interface ISmtpProvider : IoProvider
{
    string PropertyB { get; set; }
    string PropertyC { get; set; }

    public void Configure()
    {
        PropertyB = ConfigurationManager.AppSettins["B"];
        PropertyB = ConfigurationManager.AppSettins["C"];
    }
}

Main benefit of this approach is that you will have only one place to change, when new provider added to your application - just add new provider class, which knows how to configure itself. You don't need to change host implementation also. And your host will satisfy OCP principle - open for extension (you can add new providers), but closed for modification (you don't need to modify existing code when new provider added).

Also you can pass some configuration object to Configure(IConfiguration config) to this method (it will make your code testable, and not dependent on static ConfigurationManager).

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yeah, that means the host must have all parameters for the plugin. But in reality the Host is itself a (other)plugin. So when i implement a new IoProvider with new Parameters i have to rewrite (extend with the new parameters) all Host plugins. –  Radioactive Nov 27 '12 at 16:28
4  
You might consider passing in some configuration object to such a method, in order to avoid reliance on global settings. Would make testing easier, i'd think. If you still want to use the global settings, you could even do so via something like provider.Configure(ConfigurationManager.AppSettings);. –  cHao Nov 27 '12 at 16:28
    
@cHao agree, passing in configuration object is a good solution. Also unit-testing will be simple in that case. –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 27 '12 at 16:36
    
the idea with configuration object is not bad!? i can make a factory which builds the correct configuration object based on the dervied IoProvider as Factory Method in parameter... hmmm –  Radioactive Nov 27 '12 at 16:42
    
No it's not bad at all. You can create a base (could be abstract) Configuration class and cast that to the actual known type from within the plugin initialization method. –  raymond Nov 28 '12 at 4:00

If you're dead set on getting rid of the if/else statements, than you can maybe have a loader in your base class, which you pass all the parameters into, and then have each class overload it, and only use the parameters they needs.

I will way that that is a desirable patter only if all your derived classes are guaranteed to use the same small collection of parameters, just in different ways. Otherwise, the if/else statements are probably desirable

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In the end you always end up having to use a conditional statement.

Sure, you may use some library to abstract this. Such as a Dependency Injection libary and based in some constructors you may be able to do this without ifs.

But...

Its really not worth it, you'll add a lot of complexity to your code just to make it more elegant and the tradeoff it usually not worth it.

Thats not to say you can't do something better. Shooting from the hip, i'd add a method like this to the interface.

void Init(Dictionary parameters), and in each implementation you read from the dictionary and initialize the needed properties

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Normaly i can live with conditional statements but in my case i have to rewrite the hosts. (Host is itself a plugin - read above in my comments) –  Radioactive Nov 27 '12 at 16:44

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