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Is there such thing in bash or at least something similar (work-around) like forward declarations (well known in C/C++, for example)?

Or there's so such thing, because it's always executed in one pass?

If there are no forward declarations, what should I do to make my script easier for reading (it's rather long and these function definitions at the beginning, mixed with global variables, make my script looks very, very ugly and hard for reading/understanding)? I'm asking for some well-known/best practices for such cases.


For example:

# something like forward declaration
function func

# execution of the function
func

# definition of func
function func
{
    echo 123
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 31 down vote accepted

Great question. I use a pattern like this for most of my scripts:

#!/bin/bash

main() {
    foo
    bar
    baz
}

foo() {
}

bar() {
}

baz() {
}

main "$@"

You can read the code from top to bottom, but it doesn't actually start executing until the last line. By passing "$@" to main() you can access the command-line arguments $1, $2, et al just as you normally would.

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That's an elegant solution! –  Joachim Sauer Nov 27 '12 at 16:21
    
Aha! This is really elegant and clever! Thanks –  Kiril Kirov Nov 27 '12 at 16:24
    
Nice one. +1 for you :) –  icasimpan Jul 27 '13 at 13:53

When my bash scripts grow too much, I use an include mechanism:

File allMyFunctions:

foo() {
}

bar() {
}

baz() {
}

File main:

#!/bin/bash

. allMyfunctions

foo
bar
baz
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Sure, that's great, too, I just don't want to use different files for now. But +1 :) –  Kiril Kirov Nov 27 '12 at 16:40
2  
Personally, when a shell script starts growing past one file, I tend to switch to a different language ;-) –  Joachim Sauer Nov 28 '12 at 8:45

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