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Okay, say I have a Java Math class which has thread-safe implementation. Thread A is now executing SetValue(1) and it causes the Math class locked. What will happen to Thread B if it tries to access with GetValue() at the same time? Will it wait until the lock release or the method request will be terminated directly without warning or exception?

public class Math {
      private static int value = 0;

      public synchronized static void setValue(int value) {
           Math.value = value;
      }

      public synchronized static int getValue() {
           return value;
      }
}
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5  
firstly, you cannot use "this" in a static method. –  Juvanis Nov 27 '12 at 16:23
    
sorry, i just made a quick example with pure writing. i want to make sure what will the next threads behave when the class is locked. –  lannyboy Nov 27 '12 at 16:26
    
A couple of things to note here: 1) assigning to / reading from an int is an atomic operation on all Java implementations, so synchronized doesn't help in that regard. 2) Even though the class is synchronized, it will in no way prevent race conditions. –  Clockwork-Muse Nov 27 '12 at 16:38

4 Answers 4

Yes the second thread will wait until the lock becomes available again. If the lock never becomes available, you will have a liveness issue and your second thread will hang.

It is described in more details in JLS 17.1:

A synchronized method automatically performs a lock action when it is invoked; its body is not executed until the lock action has successfully completed. [...] If execution of the method's body is ever completed, either normally or abruptly, an unlock action is automatically performed on that same monitor.

Note also:

The Java programming language neither prevents nor requires detection of deadlock conditions. Programs where threads hold (directly or indirectly) locks on multiple objects should use conventional techniques for deadlock avoidance, creating higher-level locking primitives that do not deadlock, if necessary.

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It will wait, forever if necessary, for the first thread to release the lock.

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thanks for the answer :) then this is applicable for my singleton thread-safe web design :) –  lannyboy Nov 27 '12 at 16:25
    
Yes. But why not just use AtomicInteger? –  Bill Michell Nov 27 '12 at 16:26
    
no, this is not my origin design, i typed it in raw just for a sample. i just want to make sure the next thread behaviour when the class is locked. –  lannyboy Nov 27 '12 at 16:29

A small illustration:

public class Math {

 private static int value = 0;

 public synchronized static void SetValue(int _value) throws InterruptedException {

  Thread.sleep(1000L);
  value = _value;
 }

 public synchronized static int GetValue()  {

  return value;
 }

 public static void main(String[] args) {

  new Thread(new Runnable() {

   @Override
   public void run() {

    try {
     SetValue(-100);
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
     // ignore
    }
   }
  }).start();

  new Thread(new Runnable() {

   @Override
   public void run() {

    System.out.println("GetValue() = " + GetValue());
   }
  }).start();
 }
}

output is:

GetValue() = -100

Which means that the second thread is going to wait for the first one to wake up after sleeping for a second and setting the value to 100.

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1  
thanks for your explanation :) –  lannyboy Nov 27 '12 at 16:32

The Thread is added to the waiting queue, and it remains there till Thread A is executing the SetValue method, and does not releases the lock.

As soon as the Thread A releases the lock, Thread B is notified, and it can continue thereafter.

Also note that, when Thread A enters the SetValue method, it acquires lock on all the synchronized method of that class. So, Thread B cannot execute any synchronized method until Thread A finish executing the SetValue method, and gradually releases the lock.

And one more thing, it's not guaranteed that Thread B will immediately start executing the GetValue method once the lock is released. It all depends upon the CPU, when does it allocate the resource to the Thread B.


P.S: - Please follow Java Naming Conventions in your code. Your method name should start with a lowercase letter. So, your method should be getValue and setValue.

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short, concise answer. +1. –  Juvanis Nov 27 '12 at 16:24
    
thanks for your detail explanation :) –  lannyboy Nov 27 '12 at 16:30
    
@lannyboy.. You're welcome :) –  Rohit Jain Nov 27 '12 at 16:31

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