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I'm coding a Game Boy game using C. I am implementing a cursor that can move up and down depending on what button is pressed. If the UP key is pressed, the corresponding bit gets set in the register. I then make the cursor move up. The game is in a infinite while loop. So in the next iteration, the still see the register as set. I need some bookkeeping to tell myself in the future that the cursor has already been moved up and I should ignore the fact that the bit is set. How do I do this?

EDIT: Here's the code I've written. Basically when I press the up button, the cursor goes up by many steps. I want it to go up by just one step.

    if (KEY_DOWN_NOW(BUTTON_UP)){
        if (row - 1 >= 0){
            undrawCursor(row, column);
            row--;
            drawCursor(row, column);

         }
    }
    else if (KEY_DOWN_NOW(BUTTON_DOWN)){
        if (row + 1 <= 160){
            undrawCursor(row, column);
            row++;
            drawCursor(row, column);

        }
    }
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closed as not a real question by George Stocker Nov 28 '12 at 18:30

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Are you dealing with someone holding down on the UP button through two iterations, or is the bit not getting cleared after they release and you've read it? It's two different problems. –  clintp Nov 27 '12 at 16:26
    
The first one. Wait, does the bit get cleared immediately after they release it? The problem I'm having is that it moves up by more than one step. –  user1210233 Nov 27 '12 at 16:31
    
Can whoever downvoted explain the downvote? I want to understand the norms that are followed here. –  user1210233 Nov 27 '12 at 16:32
    
That's the kind of thing you need to figure out, and probably why your question's been down-voted by others. It's a really fundamental question about the API for the system, and you've shown no code to indicate that you've experimented with it! –  clintp Nov 27 '12 at 16:33
    
Your question is too vague to be answered. Add in some code and some more context. Then it just might turn out to be answerable. –  Johan Nov 27 '12 at 17:01

2 Answers 2

The register you're reading is probably just telling you the status of the buttons, and does not clear when you read it. If it worked like that, you wouldn't be able to implement a feature like "auto fire" since you wouldn't know if the button was still pressed, or if it had been released.

You need to keep a variable for each button to track it's state, and only act on changes to the state. For example, here's how you'd do it for a single button:

up_pressed = FALSE;

for (;;)
{
    if (up_pressed)
    {
        if (!KEY_DOWN_NOW(BUTTON_UP))     // up button has been released
        {
            up_pressed = FALSE;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        if (KEY_DOWN_NOW(BUTTON_UP))      // up button has been pressed
        {
            up_pressed = TRUE;
            if (row > 0)
            {
                undrawCursor(row, column);
                row--;
                drawCursor(row, column);
            }
        }
    }
}
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In old-style consoles, the logic is usually synchronized to the vertical-sync (one way to do that would be to insert a call to waitForVsync() in your game loop). So, e.g: you would run your loop body once per vsync (~60 Hz), which would mean you would move 1-step per frame, or 60 steps per second. Adjust movement appropriately.

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