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Javascript outer scope variable access

I have a javascript module that looks something like below. The main issue I'm having is how to access variables in the "this" scope from the private someOtherFunc. Is there a way to access this.myvar in the private someOtherFunc

var mymodule = (function(){

    return {   
        MyObj : function() {

            this.myvar = 123;

            this.publicfunc = function() {
                someOtherFunc();
            };

            var someOtherFunc = function() {
                //this doesn't seem to work
                this.myvar = 456;
            };

        }
     }
}

The idea is that I want to be able to do something like

new mymodule.MyObj().publicfunc, but make the someOtherFunc private

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marked as duplicate by jAndy, 0x499602D2, Frank van Puffelen, bpeterson76, j0k Nov 27 '12 at 20:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
someOtherFunc.call(this) instead of someOtherFunc(). –  Felix Kling Nov 27 '12 at 17:59

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Forget my previous answer. You can do this just by adding a private version of this.

var mymodule = (function() {
    return {   
        MyObj : function() {
            this.myvar = 123;
            var that = this;

            this.publicfunc = function() {
                someOtherFunc();
            };

            var someOtherFunc = function() {
                that.myvar = 456;
            };
            return this;
        }
    };
});

Bear in mind that, with your code, every time you call MyObj you get a new object.
So this would do what you want:

>var o = new mymodule().MyObj()
>o.myvar
123
>o.publicfunc()
>o.myvar
456

but not this

>var m = new mymodule()
>m.MyObj().myvar
123
>m.MyObj().publicfunc()
>m.MyObj().myvar
123

If that's not what you want, consider doing something like this

var mymodule = (function() {
    var myObj = null;
    this.MyObj = function() {
        if(myObj != null)
            return myObj;
        myObj = {};
        myObj.myvar = 123;

        myObj.publicfunc = function() {
            someOtherFunc();
        };

        var someOtherFunc = function() {
            myObj.myvar = 456;
        };
        return myObj;
    };
});
share|improve this answer
    
But now someOtherFunc is a public function, right? I don't want instances of MyObj to be able to access someOtherFunc –  Jeff Storey Nov 27 '12 at 17:38
    
@JeffStorey See changes in my answer. –  Yandros Nov 27 '12 at 18:54

You don't return anything from MyObj.

return this;

should fix it.

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Doesn't seem to do it –  Jeff Storey Nov 27 '12 at 17:39

Use the bind method:

var someOtherFunc = function() {
     this.myvar = 456;
}.bind(this);
share|improve this answer

Why not build it a little more deliberately?

// this one returns an object used like:
// myModule.myInt; /* 456 */
// myModule.myFunc(); /* 124 */
var myModule = (function () {
    var secretData = 123,
        publicData = 456,

        publicFunc = function () { return privateFunc(secretData); },
        privateFunc = function (num) { return num + 1; },

        public_interface = {
            myInt  : publicData,
            myFunc : publicFunc
        };

    return public_interface;

}());

I went through the trouble of explicitly naming the returned, public object, but it's now very clear what is and isn't public, and yet, each one of those things will have access to the variable versions of one another, with the one exception being that if you change myModule.myInt or publicData, they will no longer be equal.


To demonstrate what I mean in the comments below, creating multiple instances with their own private data/methods, I just add in one more layer of function-scope:

var myModule = (function () {

    var static_int = 789,

        makeInstance = function (/* any constructor values */) {
            var secretData = 123,
                publicData = 456,

                publicFunc = function () { return privateFunc(secretData); },
                privateFunc = function (num) {
                    console.log(static_int);
                    return num + 1;
                },

                public_interface = {
                    myInt  : publicData,
                    myFunc : publicFunc
                };

            return public_interface;
        };

    return makeInstance;
}());

You now use it like:

var newModule = myModule(/* instance parameters */);
newModule.myFunc();

...or

var num = myModule(/* instance parameters */).myFunc();

If you wanted to save memory, you could have static helper functions inside of the static-layer:

var myModule = (function () {

    var static_int = 789,

        static_addOne = function (num) { return num + 1; },
        static_divideBy = function (dividend, divisor) { return dividend/divisor; },

        makeInstance = function (/* any constructor values */) {
            var secretData = 123,
                publicData = 456,

                publicFunc = function () { return privateFunc(secretData); },
                privateFunc = function (num) {
                    console.log(static_int);
                    return num + 1;
                },

                public_interface = {
                    myInt  : publicData,
                    myFunc : publicFunc
                };

            return public_interface;
        };

    return makeInstance;
}());

And now you have "private" functions which are only written one time (ie: you save memory), but any instance can use those functions.

Here's the catch:
Because of how scope and closure work, the static functions have NO access to values inside of the instance (functions inside have access to the static functions, not the other way around).

So, any static helper functions MUST have the values passed to them as arguments, and if you're modifying a number or a string, you MUST return the value out of that function.

// inside of a private method, in any instance
var privateString = "Bob",

    privateFunc = function () {
        var string = static_helper(privateString);
        privateString = string;
        //...
    };
share|improve this answer
    
But what if each instance of the public_interface needs its own secretData? –  Jeff Storey Nov 27 '12 at 17:40
    
Then put all of the inner stuff inside of a function and return the function, unless you ALSO need "static" data, to share between instances, in which case, you would define the "static" vars in the outer function, and then reference them from within the function you return (which builds instances). –  Norguard Nov 27 '12 at 17:41
    
Can privateFunc access secretData in this case? (if each instance of myModule had secretData)? Can you show an example of how that's done? –  Jeff Storey Nov 27 '12 at 17:48
    
I hope the edited version helps. Short-story: each instance would need its own copy of privateFunc. That increases memory (not an issue unless you're making hundreds of thousands of these), but allows for private methods with access to private data. You can also have static data and static methods which any instance can use or modify... ...***BUT*** the static methods can't access private data, so you have to provide arguments, and collect return statements from them. –  Norguard Nov 27 '12 at 18:01
    
Thanks for the help –  Jeff Storey Nov 27 '12 at 19:09

Declare myvar using the var keyword, making it private, then access it without the this.:

function MyObj(){

        var myvar = 123;

        this.publicfunc = function() {
            someOtherFunc();
        };

        var someOtherFunc = function(){

            alert(myvar);

        };            
}


var o = new MyObj();
o.publicfunc();

If you need public access to myvar then create a public getter/setter.

jsFiddle Demo

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I think what you're looking for is a way to encapsulate myvar for changes. When some of the other answers run, myvar usually will stay as 123 because the initially returned object from mymodule holds on to that initial value.

Return a function that gets the value of myvar even after it's been modified, and I think that helps your problem.

Here's the code that works for me:

var mymodule = (function(){
    var myvar = 123,
        publicfunc = function() { myvar = 456 },
        getMyVar = function() { return myvar; };

    return {
        someOtherFunc : publicfunc,
        myPublicVar : getMyVar
     };
}());

mymodule.someOtherFunc();
alert(mymodule.myPublicVar());​  //gives you 456

JSFiddle here.

I hope this helps.

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