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How to convert a number to string and vice versa in C++

I am using Qt Creator 2.5.0 and gcc 4.7 (Debian 4.7.2-4). I added "QMAKE_CXXFLAGS += -std=c++11" to .pro file. Everything seems to be OK, I used C++11 std::for_each and so on. But when I included "string" header and wanted to use stoi, i got the following error:

performer.cpp:336: error: 'std::string' has no member named 'stoi'

I found some questions related to MinGW and one more, to Eclipse CDT and they had their answers. But I use Linux, why it is NOT working here?

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marked as duplicate by KillianDS, Nicol Bolas, WhozCraig, Fahim Parkar, Stephane Rolland Nov 29 '12 at 11:47

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Can you show the line of code that's causing this error? –  Praetorian Nov 27 '12 at 17:45
1  
Are you trying something like string.stoi(...)? It should be std::stoi(string, ...);. –  zch Nov 27 '12 at 17:48
    
you should have posted more code :) –  aldo.roman.nurena Nov 27 '12 at 17:48
1  
@KillianDS, come on.. stoi is mentioned on that post only on an "update" answer. It doesn't even give an example. This question is about how to use it, was a syntax problem. –  aldo.roman.nurena Nov 28 '12 at 18:44
    
@aldo.roman.nurena actually the exact title of this question was about how to use std::stoi (more specifically how you call it), which is answered there. –  KillianDS Nov 28 '12 at 18:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    std::string test = "45";
    int myint = stoi(test);
    std::cout << myint << '\n';
}

or

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std    

int main()
{
    string test = "45";
    int myint = stoi(test);
    cout << myint << '\n';
}

look at http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/string/basic_string/stol

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Thank you very much. It seems to be quite stupid question, but anyway, I hope it will help someone else not to ask it in future :D –  Razorfever Nov 27 '12 at 18:30
    
When I compile with g++ -std=c++11, stoi doesn't need the namespace specified like your top example. cppreference.com lists it has being in the std namespace, but has the same example you posted here. How might someone know which members of the std namespace don't need the std qualification? –  Chad Skeeters Jan 25 '13 at 15:23
1  
@Chad Skeeters: Without using namespace std, all members of std namespace need std qualification, unless they can be found by argument-dependent name lookup (ADL). ADL is the reason this code compiles without using namespace std and without std::. It is a rather extensive topic, which the margins of this comment are too narrow to contain. Search it, there is a lot of info on the Net. –  AndreyT Mar 4 at 18:23

std::stoi is a function at namespace scope, taking a string as its argument:

std::string s = "123";
int i = std::stoi(s);

From the error message, it looks like you expect it to be a member of string, invoked as s.stoi() (or perhaps std::string::stoi(s)); that is not the case. If that's not the problem, then please post the problematic code so we don't need to guess what's wrong with it.

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Thank you very much –  Razorfever Nov 27 '12 at 18:30

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