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Say you have an abstract base class:

abstract class abstractBaseClass {
    public abstractBaseClass(object argument);

    public abstractBaseClass instanceMethod() {
         //call the constructor of the concrete class here.
    }
}

And you have a base class:

class baseClass {
    public baseClass(object argument) : abstractBaseClass(object argument)
}

If you have an instance method on abstractBaseClass is there any way to call the constructor of that concrete class inside the instance method without resorting to reflection?

It seems to be reasonable to assume there is at least one constructor with the signature concreteBaseClass(object) on any given concrete base class.

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Are you saying you want to call baseClass's constructor from an instance method on abstractBaseClass? –  prprcupofcoffee Nov 27 '12 at 18:03
    
Without Constructor call, how can you have your instance for abstractBaseClass? –  FSX Nov 27 '12 at 18:04
    
I'm a bit confused by your sample code: In an abstract class (abstractBaseClass), the constructor is not marked as abstract itself. –  O. R. Mapper Nov 27 '12 at 18:05
    
It would be simple enough to do if it were a parameterless constructor through generic constraints, but I think you'll need to use reflection if you want to have a constructor with parameters. –  Servy Nov 27 '12 at 18:08
1  
It seems to be reasonable to assume there is at least one constructor with the signature concreteBaseClass(object) on any given concrete base class. -- that's not true. concrete() : base("someValue") would compile just fine. –  Austin Salonen Nov 27 '12 at 18:16
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you have an instance method on abstractBaseClass is there any way to call the constructor of that concrete class

You already do that, actually. Abstract class can not be initialized if not by it's derivates.

abstractBaseClass  abs  = new baseClass();

The real object type here is baseClass, so the ctor of it will be called by convention.

EDIT

if you mean construct *a new * real object that is hosted inside abstract reference (something that is mantioned by Sevy in comments), I would suggest, at this point, just use override pattern. Something like this:

abstract class abstractBaseClass {
    public abstract abstractBaseClass(object argument);
    public abstract abstractBaseClass CreateMe();
}


class baseClass : abstractBaseClass
{
   ...
   public override abstractBaseClass CreateMe(){
      return new baseClass();
   }
}

after use it like

abstractBaseClass  newAbs = abs.CreateMe();

Something like this, just an idea. You should figure out by yourself the real, concrete implementation that fits your needs.

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I assume he means create a new instance; that's the only way it makes sense. For example, assume the class were immutable and the methods all need to return new instances. –  Servy Nov 27 '12 at 18:04
    
@Servy: do you mean, some kind of "factory" ? –  Tigran Nov 27 '12 at 18:05
    
That's one possibility, yes. I'm not the OP, I'm just theorizing. –  Servy Nov 27 '12 at 18:06
    
I've updated the original question to more clearly communicate that this is about calling the constructor from within an instance method on the abstract class. –  MushinNoShin Nov 27 '12 at 18:10
    
@MushinNoShin: I updated my answer too. –  Tigran Nov 27 '12 at 18:11
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If you mean, "can I just call new baseClass() inside of abstractBaseClass, then yes, you can.

If you mean "can I dynamically figure out what class inherits from me and new one up", then no, not without using reflection. You have no way of knowing if there are more than one types inheriting from you.

This is, by the way, a pretty weird scenario and sounds like it violates a whole lot of best practices for OOP. Perhaps you would be better off creating a factory class to create your objects?

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Beware of infinite loops with your first statement. –  Austin Salonen Nov 27 '12 at 18:11
    
The thought is, if you have an instance of a class it was created with some constructor. It has some concrete type. Is the C# compiler smart enough to give access to that? –  MushinNoShin Nov 27 '12 at 18:12
    
It sounds like the answer below from @Tigran is what you want, then - a CreateMe() method would create another of that concrete type, thanks to polymorphism. –  bhamlin Nov 27 '12 at 18:14
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