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I am converting a User object to json via:

user.to_json :methods => :new_cookies

the new_cookies method is:

cookies.all :include => :fortune, :conditions => {:opened => false}

This embed the cookies inside the user json object, but I want fortune to be embedded inside the cookie object as well. I passed inside :include => :fortune but that doesn't that work.

Is this possible?

Models:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
    has_many :cookies
    has_many :fortunes, :through => :cookies

    def new_cookies
        cookies.all :include => :fortune, :conditions => {:opened => false}
    end
end

class Cookie < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :user
    belongs_to :fortune
end

class Fortune < ActiveRecord::Base
    serialize :rstatuses
    serialize :genders 

    has_many :cookies
    has_many :users, :through => :cookies
end
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1  
Why don't you do cookies[:fortune] = fortune (also, not sure about the cookies.all -- assume there's just one for the user). –  Tom Harrison Jr Nov 27 '12 at 19:04
    
This won't embed the fortune inside the cookie object in json... –  0xSina Nov 27 '12 at 20:40
    
I am confused. There are three distinct objects: the user object (instance of ActiveRecord::Base), the Fortune object (I guess?), and an instance of ActionDispatch::Cookies class, right? In the JSON you want the full user instance, and also the fortune instance, and all of this you want to store in an instance of Cookies? If so, there are two distinct problems: 1) json, and 2) storing in a cookie. Look at using as_json instead, then when you have that cookies[:user_as_json] or similar might work. –  Tom Harrison Jr Nov 27 '12 at 21:24
    
Please take a look at my models. –  0xSina Nov 27 '12 at 22:17
    
haha! Not browser cookies, fortune cookies! And when you use the term "object", that's the "O" from JSON. The models greatly clarify your question. I'll consider an answer. –  Tom Harrison Jr Nov 28 '12 at 1:52
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I am not sure that the :includes => :fortune option works as you expect (or perhaps at all) -- near the end of this section of the current Rails guides it mentions this option for finder methods other than .all.

I assume it works similarly to the new Active Relation query interface, e.g. Cookies.include(:fortunes).where(:opened => false) -- in this case, Rails "eager loads" the related records, meaning fortunes are fetched as part of the query for cookies. This is a performance enhancement, but doesn't otherwise change the behavior of Rails.

As I noted in the comments, I think as_json will do what you want -- it defines what is and is not part of the object when serialized using to_json. You specify methods that should be called in addition to (or to exclude) the methods of the data-backed object itself, for example, your new_cookies method.

In this example, I have added as_json to User (which gets Cookie) and also to Cookie in hopes that each cookie will nest its fortunes in its JSON. See below for an alternative.

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :cookies
  has_many :fortunes, :through => :cookies

  def as_json(option = {})
    super(:methods => :new_cookies)
  end

  def new_cookies
    cookies.all :conditions => {:opened => false}
  end
end

class Cookie < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :fortune

  def as_json(options = {})
    super(:methods => :cookie_fortune)  # or perhaps just :fortune 
  end

  def cookie_fortune
    self.fortune
  end
end

In a case where I was writing an API and didn't need to reflect the nested relationships between objects in the JSON, in the controller, I used something like

respond_to do |format|
  format.html 
  format.json { render json: { :foo => @foo, :bar => @bar }}
end

to produce parallel nodes (objects) in the JSON.

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