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Currently, I am using argparse to parse arguments and store flags as boolean options. I then check to see which flag is set to true and execute that function. Argparse parses an input file, which is opened and passed to the called function as an argument.

So:

parser.add_argument('input_data', action='store', help='some help')
parser.add_argument('outputname', action='store',default=None, help='some help')
parser.add_argument('--flag','-f', action='store_true', dest='flag', default=False, help='help!')

I have to open the input_data to read some information from it before the flag function is called. This is currently implemented as:

if args.flag == True:
    array_out = flag(array_read_from_input)
    if args.outputname == None:
        name = 'Flag.tif'

It is possible to subclass argparse to have the action keyword call a function.

Is it possible to parse the input_data option, perform some processing, and then call the flag function without having nested if loops for each argument, eg., by subclassing argparse's action parameter?

share|improve this question
    
Do not compare objects to True or None. Either use is or use the truthvalue of the object(thus it should be if args.flag: ... and if args.outputname is None). Also, you do know that you can create custom actions right? Just read the argparse documentation. – Bakuriu Nov 27 '12 at 19:52
    
@Bakuriu "It is possible to subclass argparse to have the action keyword call a function." The question is not whether it is possible to create a custom action, but whether that action can be called after parsing and manipulating other args. – Jzl5325 Nov 27 '12 at 20:01
    
If you want to call it after parsing, then I do not understand what's the relationship of argparse to your question. That module is there just to parse the command line and eventually execute actions during parsing. Also, I don't understand what's wrong with the double if. As a side note: nothing prohibits you to use a subclass of the parser and reimplemente parse_args so that the function is called there, but you'll still have to put a double if there. – Bakuriu Nov 28 '12 at 6:47
    
@Bakuriu if performing an action during parsing can I return a object to be passed to another argument for use during parsing? The issue is not with a single double if, but an implementation that has 25+ flags. A large code block is dedicated to if statements that, if possible, I want to remove as redundant. – Jzl5325 Nov 30 '12 at 17:43
    
I don't think you can "return an object", but creating a custom action you can do whatever you want with the Namespace and the parser, so instead of returning values from the function you can put them in the namespace. Anyway, maybe providing a slightly more complicated example that resembles more what you want to do might help us realize what you could do. – Bakuriu Nov 30 '12 at 19:47

Is it possible to parse the input_data option, perform some processing, and then call the flag function without having nested if loops for each argument, eg., by subclassing argparse's action parameter?

As per your question;

class FooAction(argparse.Action):
    def __call__(self, parser, namespace, values, option_string=None):
        << some processing of values >>
        array_out = flag(values)
        setattr(namespace, self.dest, array_out)

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser()
parser.add_argument('input_data', action=FooAction, help='some help')
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