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Currently, to get the data I need, I need to execute multiple SQL statements:

SELECT pubkey.pubkey_id 
FROM pubkey 
WHERE pubkey.pubkey_hash = (input data [1])

SELECT txin_corr.tx_id 
FROM txin_corr 
WHERE txin_corr.pubkey_id = (pubkey.pubkey_id from previous query [max. 1])

SELECT txin_corr.pubkey_id 
FROM txin_corr 
WHERE txin_corr.tx_id = (txin_corr.tx_id from prev.qry. [n])

SELECT pubkey.pubkey_hash
FROM pubkey 
WHERE pubkey.pubkey_id = (txin_corr.pubkey_id from prev.qry. [n])

The first query is no problem because I only have to do it once. But I'm wondering if there is a way to combine (at least) the last three queries. As the db is pretty big (~ 20 GB), I think a "good query" may speed things up considerably.

What I'm doing is: For a given pubkey_id/pubkey_hash, get all tx_ids from txin_corr that contain this pubkey_id in the same row. Then, get all pubkey_ids from txin_corr where the row contains the retrieved tx_ids. Finally, get all the pubkey_hashs for the now retrieved pubkey_ids.

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1  
Which RDBMS are we talking about here? SQL Server? Oracle? MySQL? –  DOK Nov 27 '12 at 19:15
    
I highly recommend using better names and putting together a working sql fiddle example for this question. –  Ryan Gates Nov 27 '12 at 19:29
    
I'm using MySQL 5.5. –  Micha Nov 27 '12 at 22:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The earlier answer is correct: the key is to join the tables together multiple times. But, there are one-to many relationships in there, so there will need to be left outer joins, not just the inner joins.

SELECT pk2.pubkey_hash
FROM   pubkey pk
INNER JOIN txin_corr tc ON pk.pubkey_id = tc.pubkey_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN txin_corr tc2 ON tc.tx_id = tc2.tx_id
LEFT OUTER JOIN pubkey pk2 ON tc2.pubkey_id = pk2.pubkey_id
WHERE pk.pubkey_hash = (input data)
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This works - thanks! Just one more question: Is is possible to remove duplicate results? I.e. one pubkey_hash can currently appear multiple times, but one time would be enough. –  Micha Nov 29 '12 at 12:27
1  
Sure thing, add DISTINCT to the select: SELECT DISTINCT pk2.pubkey_hash.... –  EvilBob22 Nov 29 '12 at 20:42

Here's one way. I'll not assert that this is the most efficient way to do it, but it should work across any database.

The trick is joining to the each table more than once, with a different prefix, so you can match against a different set of columns each time. So you join into txin_corr to match the initial pubkey_id, then join into it again to get the full list of related ids. Then join back 'out' to pubkey to pick up the records which match this new list of ids.

SELECT  pk2.pubkey_hash 
FROM    pubkey pk
INNER JOIN txin_corr tc on pk.pubkey_id = tc.pubkey_id
INNER JOIN txin_corr tc2 on tc.tx_id = tc2.tx_id
INNER JOIN pubkey pk2 on tc2.pubkey_id = pk2.pubkey_id
WHERE pk.pubkey_hash = (input data)
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This may not be the best way to do it but you could just chain all your selects together. if any of the queries return more then one result you can just change the relation ship from = to in and that will handle more then 1 result

SELECT pubkey.pubkey_hash
FROM pubkey 
WHERE pubkey.pubkey_id = 
        (SELECT txin_corr.pubkey_id 
         FROM txin_corr 
         WHERE txin_corr.tx_id =
                (SELECT txin_corr.tx_id 
                 FROM txin_corr 
                 WHERE txin_corr.pubkey_id = 
                        (SELECT pubkey.pubkey_id 
                         FROM pubkey 
                         WHERE pubkey.pubkey_hash = (input data [1]
                         )
                 )
         )
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