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I've been working on a project for a while now. Initially, I read about a bunch of patterns in a handful of books and online articles, and then spent a great deal of time planing the program's architecture. I decided upon combining EF 5.0 > Repository/Unit of Work > MVVM > WPF.

My initial tests showed that it looked to work perfectly, so I committed to my decided upon pattern, and spent a month implementing it. It's only now that I'm nearly done that I'm having some troubles.

One of the issues that I can't resolve is that I can't seem to construct complex queries. No matter what I try, I get one error or another.

The program uses Entity Framework 5.0 to connect to our database on our company's MS Sql 2005 Server. From there, for each entity, a repository class exists. Each repository receives a context in it's constructor, and implements a standard interface:

interface IRepository<T> where T : class
{
    IEnumerable<T> GetAll();
    IEnumerable<T> Query(Expression<Func<T, bool>> filter);
    void Add(T entity);
    void Remove(T entity);
}

The base class looks like:

public abstract class Repository<T> : IRepository<T> where T : class
{
    protected IObjectSet<T> _objectSet;

    public Repository(ObjectContext context)
    {
        _objectSet = context.CreateObjectSet<T>();
    }

    public IEnumerable<T> GetAll()
    {
        return _objectSet;
    }

    public List<T> ToList()
    {
        return _objectSet.ToList<T>();
    }

    public IEnumerable<T> Query(Expression<Func<T, bool>> filter)
    {
        return _objectSet.Where(filter);
    }

    public void Add(T entity)
    {
        _objectSet.AddObject(entity);
    }

    public void Remove(T entity)
    {
        _objectSet.DeleteObject(entity);
    }

    public void Update(T entity)
    {
        _objectSet.UpdateModel(entity);
    }

    public abstract void Upsert(T entity);


}

and a concrete repository looks like:

public class UserAccountRepository : Repository<UserAccount>
{
    public UserAccountRepository(ObjectContext context)
        : base(context)
    {
    }

    public UserAccount GetById(int id)
    {
        return _objectSet.SingleOrDefault(user => user.ID == id);
    }

    public override void Upsert(UserAccount user)
    {
        if (user == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException();
        if (user.ID == 0 || GetById(user.ID) == null)
            Add(user);
        else
            Update(user);
    }
}

Next is the UnitOfWork class. This class holds lazily loaded instances of each repository, and it instantiates it's own ObjectContext which is kept alive for the lifetime of the UnitOfWork. This context is passed to the repositories in their constructors.

The UnitOfWork class is instantiated, the changes are made through the publicly accessible repositories, and then is either saved or disposed of via public methods of the UnitOfWork class.

the UnitOfWork class:

(I only included UserAccount, ComponentPermissions and Component.. a UserAccount can access multiple Components with varying levels of permissions, which is maintained in the intermediary table, ComponentPermissions)

public class UnitOfWork : IDisposable
{


    #region Fields

    private readonly ObjectContext _context;

    private ComponentPermissionsRepository _componentPermissions;
    private ComponentRepository _components;
    private UserAccountRepository _userAccounts;

    #endregion //Fields


    #region Constructor

    public UnitOfWork()
    {
        _context = (new DataAccess.Entities() as IObjectContextAdapter).ObjectContext;
    }

    #endregion //Constructor


    #region Public Interface

    public ComponentPermissionsRepository ComponentPermissions
    {
        get
        {
            if (_componentPermissions == null)
            {
                _componentPermissions = new ComponentPermissionsRepository(_context);
            }

            return _componentPermissions;
        }

    }

    public ComponentRepository Components
    {
        get
        {
            if (_components == null)
            {
                _components = new ComponentRepository(_context);
            }

            return _components;
        }

    }


    public UserAccountRepository UserAccounts
    {
        get
        {
            if (_userAccounts == null)
            {
                _userAccounts = new UserAccountRepository(_context);
            }

            return _userAccounts;
        }

    }

    public void Commit()
    {
        _context.SaveChanges();
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        _userAccount = null;
        _component = null;
        _componentPermissions = null;
        _context.Dispose();
    }

    #endregion //Public Interface


}

I've read a bunch of articles about querying with EF, but nothing that I've read seems to work when applied to the above architecture... And I have a terrible feeling that I've shot myself in the foot, but I can't see where.

I would like to get a list of accessible Components and the corresponding ComponentPermissions, given a single UserAccount. How can I do this sort of query? The EF navigation properties seem to only work for direct neighbours... Am I missing something obvious?

EDIT

It's been pointed out that I should be more specific with my issue. The first hurdle that I can't overcome is that all of the examples seem to follow:

context.Component.Include( c => c.ComponentPermissions.Select(cps => cps.UserAccount)).ToList();

Looks good, but I don't expose my context, and even when I do, it doesn't have any entity types like Component. But now that I've changed GetAll() to IQueryable, I've managed to cobble together the following:

List<Component> comps = uow.Components.GetAll().Include(c => c.UserPermissions.Select(cps => cps.UserAccount)).ToList();
ComponentPermissions compPer = comps[0].UserPermissions.Select(up => up).Where(up => up.UserAccount.UserName == userAccount).FirstOrDefault();

This gets back the fist ComponentPermissions object that is related to a given userAccount... but this just seems so wrong, even if it sort-of worked (I say sort-of worked, because it only got one ComponentPermissions object, not all of them... but I couldn't work out how to do that)

So, looking at that, can anyone explain the right way to do that?

share|improve this question
    
This is an excellent description of the pattern you have adopted, but no information at all about the specific errors you are getting. Which queries fail? What is the error? Does it work without the pattern in a simple query? Have you traced? –  Dave Swersky Nov 27 '12 at 19:14
    
I've been banging my head against the wall for 2-3 days on this issue. I've tried so many things that it's hard to remember any one specifically. I've tried using nested Includes, an extension methods called IncludeMany, Direct references via NavigationProperties... In all honesty, I just don't know where to begin with this sort of query against EF. If I could just see one working example, I could then focus on learning how it works, rather than flailing blindly in the dark without any idea what I'm even looking for... –  Chronicide Nov 27 '12 at 19:19
1  
You've adopted a common pattern used by many developers. There is nothing wrong with the pattern itself. It sounds like you are encountering problems with complex queries and extension methods. You will get much more mileage from StackOverflow by asking a specific question about a particular query and the error you are getting. I think you'll find the issues relate to the queries, not the pattern. –  Dave Swersky Nov 27 '12 at 19:23
    
Would it help if you changed the IEnumerable<T> to IQueryable<T> in your repository? At the moment, any queries against the repository will pull the whole table into memory and then use LINQ-to-objects. –  Richard Deeming Nov 27 '12 at 19:31
1  
Your implementation is not a proper abstraction which is the intended purpose of repository pattern. Read my answer here: stackoverflow.com/a/13394334/70386 –  jgauffin Nov 28 '12 at 15:38

1 Answer 1

Well, I feel like a bit of an idiot...

I was getting the ObjectContext in the UnitOfWork by:

_context = (new DataAccess.Entities() as IObjectContextAdapter).ObjectContext;

When I should have been just working with an instance of DataAccess.Entities() (the custom context made by EF for my data).

I had to rework my repositories but an added benefit is that I think I can get rid of my concrete classes now and just use the generic repository.

I was having all these issues because I was casting DataAccess.Entities() to an ObjectContext, which didn't include any of my specific Entity Types... So I was trying to query from the repositories, which only loaded data of their own type.

One line of code... Three days of headaches. Typical.

share|improve this answer
    
Another consideration (as already mentioned in the comments on the question) is to change the Query return type from IEnumerable to IQueryable, which should give you a performance benefit if you're chaining complex queries to the results, as you won't be operating on the entire set from the original Where clause. i.e. var results = repo.Where(...); ... results.Single(...), although I suppose you could do the same with .GetAll instead. –  drzaus Jul 3 '13 at 15:42

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