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Since Task-based Asynchronous Pattern is now the recommended route (per MSDN @ here and here), how would I go about converting the simple hello world code below into a Task-based Asynchronous Pattern?

Lets assume I don't know anything about Tasks and I've tried to demo input to and output from the worker as well as calling from the 'main'.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Worker wk = new Worker();
        string result = wk.DoWork(1000);
        Console.WriteLine(result);
        Console.WriteLine("Main says, Hello World!");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

}
class Worker
{
    public string DoWork(int delay)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Worker says, working ...");
        Thread.Sleep(delay); // represents the 100ms+ workload            
        return "Worker says, I'm done! Hello World!";
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This depends on what exactly do you want to make asynchronous. If the Thread.Sleep() represents some CPU-bound work, then you're not going to gain much from using TAP.

If you want to make the wait inside DoWork() asynchronous, that means changing the signature from string to async Task<string> and then using await Task.Delay() instead of Thread.Sleep().

If you also want to make Main() asynchronous, that's more complicated, because Main() can't actually be async. Instead, you can create asynchronous MainAsync() and then synchronously Wait() for that in the real Main(). This means the main thread would be blocked, but we kind of need that to keep the application alive. Also, mixing asynchronous await with synchronous Wait() is usually not a good idea (especially since it often leads to deadlocks), but in this case it's okay.

If we make Main() asynchronous, it would be nice to make the blocking ReadLine() asynchronous too. There is no Console.ReadLineAsync(), but we can use Console.In for that.

So, the final code would look like this:

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        MainAsync().Wait();
    }

    static async Task MainAsync()
    {
        var worker = new Worker();
        string result = await worker.DoWork(1000);
        Console.WriteLine(result);
        Console.WriteLine("Main says, Hello World!");
        await Console.In.ReadLineAsync();
    }
}

class Worker
{
    public async Task<string> DoWork(int delay)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Worker says, working ...");
        await Task.Delay(delay); // represents the 100ms+ workload
        return "Worker says, I'm done! Hello World!";
    }
}
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Actually it is CPU intensive work. Why do you say If the Thread.Sleep() represents some CPU-bound work, then you're not going to gain much from using TAP.? What's the recommendation? Use case is CPU intensive stuff on webserver / IIS threads –  DeepSpace101 Nov 29 '12 at 7:06
    
On webserver, the advantage of being asynchronous is using smaller number of threads, which makes your application more scalable. But if it's CPU-intensive work, you do need a thread. So, the difference is that asynchronous code will have more overhead, and not much else. –  svick Nov 29 '12 at 8:29
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I understand that you want to execute DoWork() on a separate thread and have the result returned back. Although nonsensical, because threading wouldn't achieve anything in this example, below is the code for this.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Worker wk = new Worker();
        Task<string> task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => wk.DoWork(1000));
        Console.WriteLine(task.Result);
        Console.WriteLine("Main says, Hello World!");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

}

Task.Factory.StartNew() accepts a delegate and immediately starts executing it on a separate thread. It returns a Task object which represents the operation. task.Result will block the current thread until DoWork() has returned.

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1  
Thanks, both are great answers! –  DeepSpace101 Nov 28 '12 at 20:56
    
Asynchronous pattern and using Tasks is also useful for keeping 'UI' (granted it is just a console in this case) responsive. davenewza's code will block and will not print "Main says, Hello World!" or be able to read the line until the work task has completed, as he himself notes. The same applies to your code. But that doesn't apply to svick's code. –  Tony Nov 29 '12 at 12:39
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