Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to create an object that builds its own getters and setters dynamically:

function Person( properties ) { // 'properties' is an object literal

    this._private = properties; // private by convention

    for ( key in this._private ) {

        this[key] = function() {

            return this._private[key];
        }
    }
}

I hoped, this would create something like this:

var jack = new Person({

    working:true,
    age:33,
    gender:'male'
});

jack.working() --> true
jack.age() --> 33
jack.gender() --> 'male'

The problem is, it always returns 'male', like so:

jack.working() --> 'male'
jack.age() --> 'male'
jack.gender() --> 'male'

What am I missing? Oh, and this is just a proof of concept. I know this is not a perfect solution for creating getters and setters in JavaScript.

share|improve this question
2  
I know this is not your question, and you might already be aware, but it would improve the code if you put a 'var' in the for loop, i.e.: for ( var key in this._private ) { ... }. Otherwise the 'key' variable will be created in your global scope (or even worse: any existing variable will be overwritten). – Maate Nov 27 '12 at 20:54
    
@Maate You're absolutely right! – Kriem Nov 27 '12 at 20:57
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You've got a classic scoping issue. Create a new function to create scope around key:

function Person(properties) { // 'properties' is an object literal
    var key;

    this._private = properties; // private by convention
    this.buildGetter = function (key) {
        this[key] = function () {
            return this._private[key];
        }
    };
    for (key in this._private) {
        this.buildGetter(key);
    }
}

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/SEujb/

share|improve this answer
    
Explanation stackoverflow.com/questions/111102/… – maxwell Nov 27 '12 at 20:43
    
Dang, I was completely missing the scoping pitfall. – Kriem Nov 27 '12 at 20:44
    
So he does not need to write return this? :O – Barnabas Szabolcs Nov 27 '12 at 22:17
1  
@BarnabasSzabolcs Not sure what you mean? – Kriem Nov 28 '12 at 9:28
    
I meant at the end of function Person. – Barnabas Szabolcs Nov 28 '12 at 14:28

Everybody says eval is evil, but sometimes it can't be avoided:

function Person( properties ) { // 'properties' is an object literal

    this._private = properties; // private by convention

    for ( key in this._private ) {

        eval("this[key] = function() { return this._private['"+key.toString()+"'];}");
    }
}

jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/pitaj/9sWbe/1/

share|improve this answer
    
Although the answer by AndrewWhitaker is probably better for this instance. – PitaJ Nov 27 '12 at 20:54
1  
There's absolutely no need to use eval here. – Andrew Whitaker Nov 27 '12 at 20:56
    
@AndrewWhitaker I never said there was. I said there may be some instances where there is no other way. – PitaJ Nov 27 '12 at 20:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.