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I have adapted the following code from a tutorial to filter li elements based upon their contents:

$('#_selectSearch_' + index).keyup(function() {
       var filter = $(this).val();
       if(filter) {
          $('#_selectDrop_' + index).find("li:not(:contains(" + filter + "))").slideUp();
          $('#_selectDrop_' + index).find("li:contains(" + filter + ")").slideDown();
       } else {
          $('#_selectDrop_' + index).find("li").slideDown();
       }
    });

The code works just fine but when working with large lists is very slow bringing the browser to a grinding halt for seconds with every key-press. I have been looking around and have come to the conclusion that the way to improve this is to somehow cache the list and not operate directly on the DOM but have no idea how to implement this.

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Is this an exercise, or do you need the information for a live site/project? I ask because the answer will be different. –  gibberish Nov 27 '12 at 20:43
1  
Most likely the slideUp and slideDown are where the performance problems happen, not the .find. However, you can optimize the .find by using .find + .filter or .not. .find("li").not(":contains(" + filter + ")"); –  Kevin B Nov 27 '12 at 20:47
    
@ChrisBurdon If there is no match do you want all items to be displayed. Is that right? –  Bruno Nov 27 '12 at 22:36
    
@Bruno if there is no match it should display a message stating that there are no matches. I've just added that in. –  Chris Burdon Nov 28 '12 at 10:30
    
@Kevin B - Thanks, you where right most of the performance hit was coming from the slideUP and slideDown lines. Removing them and just hiding elements works considerably faster and the list looks no worse for it. –  Chris Burdon Nov 28 '12 at 10:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If your main concern is performance the following code:

  1. caches element containing filter string.
  2. caches li elements.
  3. doesn't show or hide elements that are already in that state.
  4. uses indexOf which is very fast.
  5. if the user types letters under 500 milliseconds apart the showMatches will not run.
var selectSearch = $("#_selectSearch_" + index );
var li = $("#_selectDrop_" + index + " li");
var currentTimeout;

selectSearch.on( "keyup", function( ) {
    if( currentTimeout ) { window.clearTimeout( currentTimeout ) };
    currentTimeout = setTimeout( showMatches, 500 );

});

function showMatches( ) {
    var txt = selectSearch.val();

    for( var i = 0, len = li.length; i < len; i++ ) {

        var content = li[i].textContent ? li[i].textContent : li[i].innerText;

        if( txt && content.indexOf( txt ) > -1) {
            if( li[i].style.display !== "block" ) {
                li[i].style.display = "block";
            }
        } else {
            if( li[i].style.display !== "none" ) {
                li[i].style.display = "none";
            }
        }
    }
}

Fiddle with 400 li elements here

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drop = $('#_selectDrop_' + index + ' li');
$('#_selectSearch_' + index).keyup(function() {
   var filter = $(this).val();
   if(filter) {
      drop.find(":not(:contains(" + filter + "))").slideUp();
      drop.find(":contains(" + filter + ")").slideDown();
   } else {
      drop.slideDown();
   }
});

Drop will be cached just once, and then will be used at every keyup. Also this uses the minimum possible of find

share|improve this answer
    
.find -> .filter –  Kevin B Nov 27 '12 at 20:48
$('#_selectSearch_' + index).keyup(function() {

   var filter = $(this).val();

   // by combining and cacheing all the way to the li
   // we save a lot of time, since it seems that's where you are doing
   // all your searching from

   var selectDrop = $('#_selectDrop_' + index + ' li');

   if (filter) {
      selectDrop.not(':contains("' + filter + '")').slideUp();
      selectDrop.contains(filter).slideDown();
   } 
   else {
      selectDrop.slideDown();
   }
});
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You can cache this element $('#_selectDrop_' + index + ' li');

$('#_selectSearch_' + index).keyup(function() {
    var $li = $('#_selectDrop_' + index + ' li');
    var filter = $(this).val();
    if (filter) {
        $li.not(":contains(" + filter + ")").slideUp();
        $li.contains(filter).slideDown();
    } else {
        $li.slideDown();
    }
});​
share|improve this answer
    
the .contains() method is jQuery is used to check if a DOM element exists within another DOM element, not to check that certain text can found in that element. –  Bruno Nov 27 '12 at 22:33

I'll give it a go with a somewhat modified (and untested) version:

$('#_selectSearch_' + index).on('keyup', function() {
    var filter = this.value,
        lis = document.getElementById('_selectDrop_' + index).getElementsByTagName('li'),
        len = lis.length,
        sup = 'textContent' in this;
    if (filter.length) {
        for (var i = len; i--) {
            var text = sup ? lis[i].textContent : lis[i].innerText;
            $(lis[i])[text.indexOf(filter) != -1 ? 'slideDown' : 'slideUp']();
        }
    } else {
        $(lis).slideDown();
    }
});​
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