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At work I'm doing this application that takes values from an external file (Excel sheet, text file, ...) and translates those values into complex instructions that are fed into another system.

The below code is a bit simplified (no instructions and very simple logic) but the idea remains the same. I have around 60 different translators that run different kinds of business logic behind. Some take only one argument to run. Others take multiple arguments.

I have an abstract translator class. The user of the class will use 2 public methods: Translate to run the translation logic and CanTranslate allows to see if the translator is ready to start.

The developer using this abstract class needs to implement the DoTranslate method which will contain the actual business logic. By default CanTranslate always return true but if validation is required it can be overridden.

Here's the abstract translator base class:

// Contains some base logic which is the same for all translators
public abstract class BaseTranslator
{
    // Public translate method
    public void Translate()
    {
        if (CanTranslate())
            DoTranslate();
    }

    // Checks if we are ready to translate
    // True by default
    public virtual bool CanTranslate()
    {
        return true;
    }

    // This method is used to implement business logic
    public abstract void DoTranslate();
}

And here's an implementation of a concrete translator class:

// Translates beer names
public class ReverseTranslator : BaseTranslator
{
    // Use of properties to allow strongly typed arguments
    // which can be seen by the developer at design time
    public string BeerName { get; set; }

    // Validation
    public override bool CanTranslate()
    {
        if (BeerName.Equals("Budweiser") || BeerName.Equals("Stella"))
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }

    // Implementation of the business logic
    public override void DoTranslate()
    {
        char[] letters = BeerName.ToCharArray();
        Array.Reverse(letters);
        Console.WriteLine(new string(letters));
    }
}

And here's what it looks like when in use:

class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var translator = new ReverseTranslator();

        translator.BeerName = "Stella";
        translator.Translate();

        translator.BeerName = "I'm not a beer";
        // This line will not translate since it's not a valid beer name.
        translator.Translate();

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

Pro's:

  • separates specific business logic in small maintainable units
  • translators are easy to reuse in other parts of the application
  • translators can easily be unit tested
  • properties allow a user of a translator to see which arguments are required

My problem:

  • different controller classes are using many translators. I have too much coupling.

I thought of using the Factory pattern for translator creation but then I can't use properties as argument hints at design time.

So I'm basically looking for a solution in which during design time you can easily see which arguments are required. And at the same time I would hope to reduce coupling by not having each controller having 30 new xTranslator statements.

PS: I'm limited to use .NET 3.5 for this code.

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How are you determining which translator to use for a row? Are you just creating one of each type of translator and testing if it CanTranslate? –  Mr.Mindor Nov 27 '12 at 22:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

To have the design-time info of the specific parameters of a concrete class: you need to be working with an instance of the concrete class.
To reduce coupling in your controllers: you need to limit yourself instances of the abstract class.
You can't have both in the same place at the same time.

Reworking your overall design you can eliminate the coupling and remove the need for design time info.

Move the creation and initialization of the translators out of the controller into a factory or IoC container that takes as input a row of data from your external files (massaged if needed into a format it can work with).

Have the translators require a constructor that takes a collection of arguments.
Benefits:

  • Only the concrete class itself needs to know details about itself or its parameters.
  • The factory needs info about which translator to use in which circumstance.

.

class TranslatorFactory
{
    //translator lookup table
    private Dictionary<string, Func<List<string>,BaseTranslator>> Translators = 
        new Dictionary<string,Func<List<string>,BaseTranslator>>{
            {"Reverse", (args)=>new ReverseTranslator(args)},
            {"Explode", (args)=>new ExplodeTranslator(args)}        };

    public BaseTranslator GetTranslatorForRow(string command, List<string> arguments)
    {
        if(Translators.ContainsKey(command) )
        {
             return Translators[command](arguments);
        }
        return null; //or default, or throw exception
    }
}


abstract class BaseTranslator
{
    ...
    public BaseTranslator(List<string> args)
    {
    }
}

class ReverseTranslator: BaseTranslator
{
    public string BeerName {get;set;}
    public ReverseTranslator(List<string> args)
    {
        BeerName = args[0];
    }
}

You can go further and remove coupling between your factory and the concrete classes using attributes and reflection to build the look up table dynamically.

[TranslatorFor("Reverse")]
class ReverseTranslator: BaseTranslator
{
    ...
}
share|improve this answer
different controller classes are using many translators. I have too much coupling

Controller classes should depend only on abstraction, which is BaseTranslator. Thus you will not have much coupling, indeed it will be loose coupled code. Inject dependencies into your controllers via dependency injection (e.g. via constructor parameters).

One option to make your code dependent only on base type - create string property Text in base class:

BaseTranslator translator = new ReverseTranslator(); // inject implementation
translator.Text = "Stella";
translator.Translate();
translator.Text = "I'm not a beer";
translator.Translate();
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Add explanation about how to handle different kinds of inputs for different concrete types (since they expect different parameters) and this would be the answer. –  Tengiz Nov 27 '12 at 21:57

It occurs to me that there is something contradictory about:

  • On one side the Translator authors can define their own concrete classes (and add new 'mandatory' properties that must have a value for the concrete class to work properly)
  • On the other side you depend on the new concrete classes defined by others in your code since you are the one instantiating the classes and passing in correct parameters to them

If this is right, I believe that you have not found the right level of abstraction for your model. In other words, your current abstraction does not help you at all (more or less), since it is extended in each concrete class. So my suggestion would be to first look at the model itself (but it is just a guess since I don't know your model :-) ).

Someone in here would probably be able to guide you better if you where able to supply a list of say 7-10 representative concrete class names and the input values they would expect to let us understand your domain better.

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This is more a comment then an answer. –  Mr.Mindor Nov 27 '12 at 22:58

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