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Say I have arraylist A and to compare 2 objects of A I do a.getDistanceFromPlayer() < b.getDistanceFromPlayer().

I want to now have list B which will have all of A's objects, but sorted where the first object is closest to player, and last object is furthest.

What might be the fastest way to do this?

Thanks

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closes to player - which player? –  Rohit Jain Nov 27 '12 at 22:23
    
The distances are already computed, the compare is just compare float A to float B –  Milo Nov 27 '12 at 22:24
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Have A implement Comparable and then define the method compareTo(Object other) like so:

public int compareTo(Object other) {
  if( this.getDistanceFromPlayer() < other.getDistanceFromPlayer() ) {
      return -1;
  } else if( this.getDistanceFromPlayer() > other.getDistanceFromPlayer())  {
      return 1;
  }
  return 0;
}

Now you can call Collections.sort() on your list of objects

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Use Collections.sort with a custom comparator.

eg.
public class DistanceComparator implements Comparator<Integer>{

    @Override
    public int compare(YourObject o1, YourObject o2) {
        if (o1.getDistanceFromPlayer() > o2.getDistanceFromPlayer())
        {
           return 1;
        } 
        else if (o1.getDistanceFromPlayer() < o2.getDistanceFromPlayer())
        {
           return -1;
        }
        return 0;
    }
}

Then in your program, call

Collections.sort(YourArrayInstance, new DistanceComparator())
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You should make your class implement Comparable.

Then you can use Collections.sort() to sort your List.

If you want a sorted List AND an unsorted List, you'll have to make a copy.


Another option is to create a Comparator.

If you read the documentation for Collections, you'll see it has two sort methods.

One bases the sort on the objects' compareTo method (ie their "natural order").

The other bases the sort on a Comparator that is passed as the second argument.


Here's a link to another question that provides an example implementation of Comparable:

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How might I implement comparable? –  Milo Nov 27 '12 at 22:25
    
It's a very simple interface to implement. It only has one method, compareTo which compares an object to another instance of the same type. It returns an int based on the comparison. If you read the documentation from the provided link, you'll learn some more. I'll post a link to a similar question in a moment... –  jahroy Nov 27 '12 at 22:26
    
However, if you need to sort the objects by varying criteria, using a Comparator is better. –  Patricia Shanahan Nov 27 '12 at 22:44
    
@PatriciaShanahan - Agreed. Implementing Comparable is better if this is the defulat way to sort the object (ie the object's natural order). If there are different ways that the object will get sorted, using a Comparator is better. I edited my answer to include both options. –  jahroy Nov 27 '12 at 22:48
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Use a Custom Comparator :

B = Collections.sort(A, new CustomComparator());

public class CustomComparator implements Comparator<ClassA> {

    @Override
    public int compare(final ClassA a, final ClassA b) {
         //Make sure you check that neither a nor b are null..
         //..
         if (a.getDistanceFromPlayer() < b.getDistanceFromPlayer()) {
             return 1;
         } else if (a.getDistanceFromPlayer() > b.getDistanceFromPlayer()) {
             return -1;
         }
         return 0;

   }
}
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You can use a custom Comparator and sort your ArrayList, like this:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.Comparator;

class Main {
    public static class Player {
        private final float distance;

        public Player (final float position) {
            this.distance = position;           
        }

        public float getDistanceFrom () {
            return distance;
        }

        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return "Player [distance=" + distance + "]";
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        final ArrayList<Player> players = new ArrayList<Player> ();

        players.add (new Player (2));
        players.add (new Player (5));
        players.add (new Player (-3));
        players.add (new Player (1));

        Collections.sort(players, new Comparator<Player> () {
            @Override
            public int compare(Player o1, Player o2) {
                final float distance1 = o1.getDistanceFrom();
                final float distance2 = o2.getDistanceFrom();
                return (int) Math.signum (distance1 - distance2);
            }           
        });
        System.out.println(players);
    }
}

And a fiddle for it.

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This is correct and valid. However, sometimes I think it's easier for beginners to understand if the Comparator is implemented as a traditional class (rather than defining it inline). I also don't see the benefit to using Math.signum (I've seen this a few times on this site). Why not just return the difference (as an int)? –  jahroy Nov 27 '12 at 22:37
    
@jahroy You have tosomehow convert the difference, which is a float to an int. You can't just make (int) (a - b) because of the way rounding works - you must use Math.signum. –  ShyJ Nov 27 '12 at 22:42
    
Fair enough. Now I understand. You learn something every day at this site! For the record I already upvoted this answer. –  jahroy Nov 27 '12 at 22:51
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