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Okay so I was assigned a lab a while ago in which we are supposed to make a very simplified version of Conway's game of life.

Rules: Ravenous slime (designated by R) will eat any slow slimes (designated by S) that are adjacent to it (directly above, below, or beside). Once the ravenous slime have "eaten" the slow slime, a new time step occurs in which 4 new slow slimes are placed randomly on the board. I have to represent 4 time steps.

Unfortunately my code doesn't work as it should. For whatever reason, my four slow slimes don't spawn after each time step. I've slaved over the code but i can't fund the bug. Please help.

Code:

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <cstdlib>
#include <ctime>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

//Struct
struct Creatures
{
    public: int type;
    public: int age;
    public: double weight;
    private: double length;

};

//Prototypes
void printLake(Creatures Sludge[10][10]);
void fourNew(Creatures Sludge [10][10], Creatures slowSlime);
void dispatch(Creatures Sludge[10][10], Creatures water);

int main()
{
    //creating the slimes, the water, and the grid (called sludge)
    Creatures Sludge[10][10];
    Creatures slowSlime;
    slowSlime.type = 1;
    Creatures ravenousSlime;
    ravenousSlime.type = 2;
    Creatures water;
    water.type = 3;

    //Initialize Lake
    for (int row = 0; row<10; row++)
    {
        for (int col = 0; col<10; col++)
        {
            Sludge[row][col] = water;
        }
    }

    //Random Distribution of Slow Slimes
    srand(time(0));
    int high = 10;               
    int low = 0;                     
    int i = 0;
    while(i<15)
    {
        int row = rand()% (high - low + 1) + low;
        int col = rand()% (high - low + 1) + low;
        if (Sludge[row][col].type == 3)
        {
            Sludge[row][col] = slowSlime;
            i++;
        }
    }

    //Random Distribution of Ravenouse Slimes
    int c = 0;
    while (c<5)
    {
        int row = rand()% (high - low + 1) + low;
        int col = rand()% (high - low + 1) + low;
        if (Sludge[row][col].type ==3)
        {
            Sludge[row][col] = ravenousSlime;
            c++;
        }
    }

    //Time steps
    cout<<"Step 1"<<endl;
    printLake(Sludge);
    dispatch(Sludge, water);
    fourNew(Sludge, water);
    cout<<endl;
    cout<<"Step 2"<<endl;
    printLake(Sludge);
    dispatch(Sludge, water);
    cout<<endl;
    fourNew(Sludge, water);
    cout<<"Step 3"<<endl;
    printLake(Sludge);
    dispatch(Sludge, water);
    cout<<endl;
    fourNew(Sludge, water);
    cout<<"Step 4"<<endl;
    printLake(Sludge);
    dispatch(Sludge, water);
    fourNew(Sludge, water);
    cout<<endl;
    int j;
    cin>>j;
    return 0;
}

void printLake(Creatures Sludge[10][10])
{
    for (int row = 0; row<10; row++)
    {
        for (int col = 0; col<10; col++)
        {
            if (Sludge[row][col].type == 1)
            {
                cout<<"S ";
            }
            if (Sludge[row][col].type == 2)
            {
                cout<<"R ";
            }
            if (Sludge[row][col].type == 3)
            {
                cout<<"_ ";
            }
        }
        cout<<endl;
    }
}

void fourNew(Creatures Sludge [10][10], Creatures slowSlime)
{
    srand(time(0));
    int high = 10;               
    int low = 0;                     
    int i = 0;
    while(i<4)
    {
        int row = rand()% (high - low + 1) + low;
        int col = rand()% (high - low + 1) + low;
        if (Sludge[row][col].type == 3)
        {
            Sludge[row][col] = slowSlime;
            i++;
        }
    }
}

void dispatch(Creatures Sludge[10][10], Creatures water)
{
  for (int row = 0; row<10; row++)
  {
        for(int col = 0; col<10; col++)
        {
              if(Sludge[row][col].type == 2)
              {
                    if(Sludge[row][col-1].type == 1)
                    {
                          Sludge[row][col-1] = water;
                    }
                    if(Sludge[row][col+1].type == 1)
                    {
                          Sludge[row][col+1] = water;
                    }
                    if(Sludge[row-1][col].type == 1)
                    {
                          Sludge[row-1][col] = water;
                    }
                    if(Sludge[row+1][col].type == 1)
                    {
                          Sludge[row+1][col] = water;
                    }
              }
        }
  }
}

OUTPUT:

UPDATED OUTPUT: enter image description here enter image description here

I see a couple new slow slimes on step 4, but none on step 2...

share|improve this question
1  
Have you tried a debugger, stepping through the code line-by-line? gdb is your friend! –  Unsigned Nov 27 '12 at 23:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

After a quick look, I would say the problem is here:

fourNew(Sludge, water);

What you want is probably:

fourNew(Sludge, slowSlime);

To elaborate: your function

void fourNew(Creatures Sludge [10][10], Creatures slowSlime)

takes two parameters called Sludge and slowSlime. This is an unfortunate choice of names, because internally the compiler doesn't use those names to generate code; they are strictly for your convenience. You probably expected the compiler to automatically check that the correct parameters are passed to the function, but C++ has no facilities to allow that - variable names are not checked, only types.

Function parameters act as local variables. When you pass the values in your main:

fourNew(Sludge, water)

What happens is this:

The Sludge in fourNew() becomes equal to the Sludge in main()

The slowSlime in fourNew() becomes equal to the water in main()

So in effect you are asking for the creation of four water objects.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, thanks man, I think that did it! That was a great find...also I feel kinda silly now :p Thanks again! –  T-Slice Nov 28 '12 at 0:46

There are several issues.


Call srand() once, and only once. Calling it multiple time resets the random seed. Calling it with the same value makes the rand() calls repeat. If time(0) results in the same value (because your program may execute very quickly), then when you try to create fourNew(), it'll repeat the same spots and won't be very random.


In your dispatch() function, what if Sludge[0][0] has type == 2? Sludge[row][col-1] will be out of bounds, as will Sludge[row-1][col]! You need to make sure you're ranges are correct. You'll also overflow for the last row/column when you do row+1/column+1.


AndreyT has mentioned a good thing, but these other issues need looking at too.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, you're totally right, I forgot about that, but I haven't gotten any overflow errors yet...I wonder why. –  T-Slice Nov 28 '12 at 0:04
    
@MiniatureBeast: That's what makes array-out-of-bounds errors such a pain in the butt (and any other type of undefined behavior). Because the behavior is totally undefined, it might work perfectly for you a billion times, and then for a client/teacher totally crash (or worse, change other parts of data in the program!). This likely didn't cause any runtime problems because a) you're just reading from memory, and b) it's likely your program "owns" the memory around that array, so reading it is legal, as far as the OS is concerned. –  Cornstalks Nov 28 '12 at 1:35

This does not apply to your problem, since the rules of the game are sufficiently simple to allow implementing it on a single board. But just in case, if you'l have to change the rules in the future:

I programs like that each new state of the board is usually calculated from the previous state of the board. It is important to observe that as you analyze the current board state and generate the future board state, the modifications that you make to the future board state should not be visible (yet) in the current board state.

In other words, for everything to work correctly very often in games like this you have to maintain two boards: the current one and the future one. You begin each timestep by copying the current board to the future one. Then you analyze the current board and modify the future one. Once you are done, the future board becomes the current board, and the cycle repeats.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought arrays were automatically passed by reference...wouldn't that mean I would't have to make multiple copies? –  T-Slice Nov 28 '12 at 0:02

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