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I'm trying to compile a program that includes liboss's file, but when I compile I get the following error.

In file included from test.c:1:
/opt/local/include/liboss/soundcard.h:342: error: static declaration of ‘ioctl’ follows non-static declaration
/usr/include/sys/ioctl.h:97: error: previous declaration of ‘ioctl’ was here
/opt/local/include/liboss/soundcard.h:353: error: static declaration of ‘open’ follows non-static declaration
/usr/include/sys/fcntl.h:464: error: previous declaration of ‘open’ was here
/opt/local/include/liboss/soundcard.h:363: error: static declaration of ‘close’ follows non-static declaration
/usr/include/unistd.h:476: error: previous declaration of ‘close’ was here
/opt/local/include/liboss/soundcard.h:366: error: conflicting types for ‘write’
/usr/include/unistd.h:535: error: previous declaration of ‘write’ was here

The line where the first error occurs is this one.

@ soundcard.h

static inline int LIBOSS_IOCTL (int x, unsigned long y,...)
{
    int result;

    va_list l;
    va_start(l,y);
    result = liboss_ioctl(x,y,l);
    va_end (l);
    return result;
}

@ ioctl.h

__BEGIN_DECLS
int ioctl(int, unsigned long, ...);
__END_DECLS

Is there any way in which I can monkey-patch soundcard.h so that this won't be an issue?

Thnx! A.

Specs: Mac OSX 10.7.4, gcc i686-apple-darwin11-llvm-gcc-4.2 (GCC) 4.2.1

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1 Answer 1

It sounds like liboss is trying to provide an oss-compatible soundcard interface on a system where that's non-native by redefining the ioctl function to provide the OSS ioctl operations without the kernel having support for them. If this is the case, you need to make sure sys/ioctl.h (or any header that might include it) does not get included in the same source files that use soundcard.h.

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Tried it and now it skips only to the following error (see question). There is an #undef directive a little below in soundcard.h. Wouldn't that do the trick? Why isn't it working? –  misterte Nov 28 '12 at 0:32

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