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I have the following smart_ptr class.

template <typename T>
class smart_ptr
{
public:
    // ... removed other member functions for simplicity
    T* get() { return ptr; }

    template <typename... Args>
    decltype(T::template operator ()(Args()...)) operator ()(Args... args) const
    {
        return (*get()).operator ()(args...);
    }

private:
    T* ptr;
};

However, when I use the smart_ptr class for type T without an operator (), it fails to compile (and rightly so).

What I wanted is to use std::enable_if to enable the member function only when T has operator (). It got obscure and complex very fast when I got into doing it, as I was thinking of using SFINAE to detect if T has operator () and then combine it with std::enable_if to get what I want. However, I got lost in creating SFINAE that is capable of detecting a variadic templated operator () (i.e. NOT a duplicate of Is it possible to write a C++ template to check for a function's existence?).

Can anyone help? Or give another (perhaps simpler) solution?

p.s. It has to work on GCC 4.5.3.

EDIT: For the sake of completeness, I've answered my own question with a working solution for GCC 4.5.3.

share|improve this question
1  
Specifically, check my answer, which shows how it can be easily done with the trailing return type: auto operator()(Args... args) -> decltype((*get())(args...)){ ... }. Question, though: Why restrict to operator()? If T defines a conversion to function pointer, you can get so-called surrogate call functions, and although they may not be common, it's best to be generic (and it looks neater). –  Xeo Nov 27 '12 at 23:33
    
Xeo: How is it a duplicate? This is a function with variadic template, not a straight forward function which I've already got to know a few years back! –  Zach Saw Nov 27 '12 at 23:42
    
'it fails to compile (and rightly so)'. Hm, should the compiler not postpone instantiation of class template members to the point where they are used? That would mean it should not fail to compile unless you actually tried to use the operator() or you somehow force complete template instantiation? –  sehe Nov 27 '12 at 23:45
1  
@Zach: Well, you do know that 4.5 generally had bad variadic template support, right? Any reason you can't update the compiler? –  Xeo Nov 27 '12 at 23:59
1  
@Xeo: The question explicitly said for GCC 4.5.3. If it's not possible with it, then answer and say it is not possible. –  Zach Saw Nov 27 '12 at 23:59

2 Answers 2

Edited: completely different from the original answer, which did not give a real solution.

This code compiled on ideone which uses gcc 4.5.1. It's the best I can do.

#include <array>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

template<typename T>
struct has_property
{
    struct UnmentionableType { UnmentionableType() {} };

    //test if type has operator() (...)
    template<typename U, typename A1, typename A2, typename A3, typename A4, typename A5>
    static auto ftest(U* t, A1 a1, A2 a2, A3 a3, A4 a4, A5 a5) -> decltype((*t)(a1, a2, a3, a4, a5), char(0));
    static std::array<char, 2> ftest(...);

public:
    static const bool value = sizeof(ftest((T*)0, UnmentionableType(), UnmentionableType(), UnmentionableType(), UnmentionableType(), UnmentionableType())) == 1;
};

class c1
{
public:
    int operator() () {  return 0; }
};

class c2
{
public:
    void operator() (int) { }
};

class c3
{
public:
    template<typename... Args>
    void operator() (Args... a) { }
};

class c4
{
public:
    template<typename T>
    void operator() (T t) { }
};

int main()
{
    cout<<boolalpha<<has_property<c1>::value<<endl;
    cout<<boolalpha<<has_property<c2>::value<<endl;
    cout<<boolalpha<<has_property<c3>::value<<endl;
    cout<<boolalpha<<has_property<c4>::value<<endl;
}

output:

false
false
true
false

Notes:

1) As requested, it only triggers on variadic templated operator() (well, almost)

2) It's not a "perfect" solution, but it should be good enough for practical use.

Unfortunately gcc 4.5.1 can't expand parameter packs; I suspect this might work for you:

template<typename U, typename... A>
static auto ftest(U* t, A... a) -> decltype((*t)(a...), char(0));

I still don't see a way to actually TEST the true variadicity of the function, as opposed to just passing it 5 (or more) random-type parameters.

Usage with_enable if - I don't see any other solution than partial class specialization:

//non-specialized
template<typename T, typename E=void>
class container
{
    T* ptr;

public:
    T* get() { return ptr; }
};

//specialization for class with appropriate operator()
template<typename T>
class container<T, typename std::enable_if<has_property<T>::value, void>::type>
{
    T* ptr;

public:
    T* get() { return ptr; }

    template <typename... Args>
    decltype(T::template operator ()(Args()...)) operator ()(Args... args) const
    {
        return (*get()).operator ()(args...);
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
My question was specifically ''for a variadic template operator()'' –  Zach Saw Nov 27 '12 at 23:45
    
And not to mention GCC 4.5.3 –  Zach Saw Nov 28 '12 at 0:15
    
Fair enough. I've edited my answer to something that is (hopefully) useful. –  Andrei Tita Nov 28 '12 at 0:46
    
Thank you for your answer. This is very close to what I want. Could you also use enable_if with your solution to demonstrate how I can achieve what I'm after? Especially the second template arg of enable_if -- I do not know what to pass it without getting the compiler to fail on type T that does not declare operator (). –  Zach Saw Nov 28 '12 at 0:55
    
Given your existing code, I don't see any other solution than class template specialization, which would involve either rewriting the whole class for the two cases, or inheritance; is that acceptable? The reason I don't think you could use function template specialization for operator() is that it doesn't have a fixed return type so I don't see how to overload based on signature. Maybe there is a solution. –  Andrei Tita Nov 28 '12 at 1:24
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Finally, I've found a workaround for GCC 4.5.3!

template <typename T>
class smart_ptr
{
public:
    // ... removed other member functions for simplicity
    T* get() const { return ptr; }

private:
    template <typename... Args>
    struct opparen_constret
    {
        typedef decltype(std::declval<T const>()(std::declval<Args>()...)) type;
    };

    template <typename... Args>
    struct opparen_ret
    {
        typedef decltype(std::declval<T>()(std::declval<Args>()...)) type;
    };

public:
    template <typename... Args>
    typename opparen_constret<Args...>::type operator ()(Args... args) const
    {
        return (*get())(args...);
    }

    template <typename... Args>
    typename opparen_ret<Args...>::type operator ()(Args... args)
    {
        return (*get())(args...);
    }

private:
    T* ptr;
};
share|improve this answer
    
You can actually compile this if you try to instantiate for a type without operator()? You don't seem to have a fallback case (doesn't compile on ideone). –  Andrei Tita Nov 28 '12 at 1:54
    
@AndreiTita: It does compile on ideone - ideone.com/uiW9rI –  Zach Saw Nov 28 '12 at 2:23
    
@AndreiTita: There's no need for a fallback because of SFINAE. –  Zach Saw Nov 28 '12 at 2:24
    
Agreed. It did not compile because of some other code (my fault). I see now how this works. It's nice. –  Andrei Tita Nov 28 '12 at 2:47

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