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I just hit a snag with Robotium trying to reproduce a bug with a functional test. My activity was not setup to properly handle the "next" key when moving from the user name field to the password field during sign in. I was Googling for a bit and I couldn't com up with a solution. I tried this on my Galaxy Nexus:

    solo.clearEditText(0);
    solo.enterText(0, Constants.TEST_ACCOUNT_1.getUsername());
    solo.clickOnEditText(0);
    solo.clickOnScreen(672,1132);
    solo.clickOnEditText(0);
    solo.sleep(15000);
    solo.enterText(1, Constants.TEST_ACCOUNT_1.getPassword());

The idea is to click in the text field to raise the keypad then attempt to click the next button however the click in the edit text field does not raise the keypad. I've also tried sending the enter key and I tried sending the enter key with FLAG_EDITOR_ACTION and neither of them simulate the "next" key. Help!

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Robotium does not seem to have a method for displaying the keyboard. Additionally, it seems as though the keyboard runs outside of the scope of what Robotium can interact with, as clickOnText() won't press soft keyboard buttons even if it is visible. Therefore, this answer is going to be a bit of a hack.

There are two significant parts to the solution. First, while we cannot click the IME Next button directly using dispatchKeyEvent as we can with other keyboard buttons, we can trigger its callback by using EditText.onEditorAction(EditorInfo.IME_ACTION_NEXT). This will allow us to skip ahead to the next EditText. Second, triggering this callback falls into the category of "interacting with the UI", so we must move from the thread running Robotium back to the main thread to make the call. We'll use Activity.runOnUiThread() to achieve this.

Here's an example of how it worked for me:

public void testImeNext() throws Exception
{
    //Grab a reference to your EditText.  This code grabs the first Edit Text in the Activity
    //Alternatively, you can get the EditText by resource id or using a method like getCurrentEditTexts()
    //Make sure it's final, we'll need it in a nested block of code.
    final EditText editText = solo.getEditText(0);

    //Create a runnable which triggers the onEditorAction callback
    Runnable runnable = new Runnable() 
    {
        @Override
        public void run() 
        {
            editText.onEditorAction(EditorInfo.IME_ACTION_NEXT);
        }
    };

    //Use Solo to get the current activity, and pass our runnable to the UI thread.
    solo.getCurrentActivity().runOnUiThread(runnable);
}
share|improve this answer
    
my editText gives null pointer exception .. – roger_that Feb 17 '14 at 6:15

Building on the other answer, I've written a method which simulates the IME button press and does not return until the request on the UI thread has completed.

/**
 * This will send the NEXT action to simulate pressing next on the keyboard.
 * Because it has to be run on the UI thread we use a barrier to block and
 * stop this request returning until the action is complete.
 **/
private void sendIMENext(final EditText editText) throws Exception {
    final CyclicBarrier barrier = new CyclicBarrier(2);

    Runnable runnable = new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            editText.onEditorAction(EditorInfo.IME_ACTION_NEXT);

            try {
                barrier.await();
            }
            catch (Exception e) {
                Log.e("MainActivityTest", "Interupted on UI thread pressing IME next", e);
            }
        }
    };

    //Use Solo to get the current activity, and pass our runnable to the UI thread.
    solo.getCurrentActivity().runOnUiThread(runnable);
    // Waits until the barrier is met in the runnable
    barrier.await();
}

This should always return but you can add a timeout to the second await if you like.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice idea! I haven't tried either of these suggestions as I've since moved onto other work but I'll have to go back and try them both. – Cliff Oct 9 '13 at 15:11
    
It just cleans up the tests a bit. You can just call sendIMENext() and it will just wait until the action is done before moving onto the next step. Makes the tests a lot more readable :) – matto1990 Oct 10 '13 at 9:55

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