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for x in range(6):
  why = str(x+1)
  outf.write(why)

where outf is a file

gives me:

why = str(x+1)
TypeError: expected a character buffer object
share|improve this question
    
It appears you are dying on the call to str(), not the file write. Could you provide a larger, otherwise working example of your problem? – Silas Ray Nov 27 '12 at 23:52
2  
Are you sure the code you've shown is actually the code you're running? – Jon Clements Nov 27 '12 at 23:52
3  
Have you bound the name str to something else previously? – wim Nov 27 '12 at 23:54
    
An easy way to check what @wim has said is at the point it barfs - import __builtin__; print str is __builtin__.str – Jon Clements Nov 28 '12 at 0:01

I'm not convinced you've posted the code you're running, but there are other ways of writing it that avoid explicit calling of str and +1'ing (assuming one number per line is intended and 2.x):

for i in xrange(1, 7): # save the +1
    print >> fout, i 

fout.writelines('{}\n'.format(i) for i in xrange(1, 7))

from itertools import islice, count
fout.writelines('{}\n'.format(i) for i in islice(count(1), 6))
share|improve this answer

Works for me (in ipython, python 2.7 ):

In [1]: outf = open('/tmp/t', 'w')

In [2]: for x in range(6):
   ...:     why = str(x+1)
   ...:     outf.write(why)

In [3]: outf.close()

The content of the file: 123456

What python version are you using?

share|improve this answer

This works for me

outf = open('/temp/workfile', 'w')
for x in range(6):
    why = str(x+1)
    outf.write(why)
outf.flush()
outf.close()

/temp/workfile contains 123456

share|improve this answer

Assuming you are new to Python...

new_File = open('mynewfile.txt', 'wr')
for x in range(6):
    new_File.write(str(x)+'\n')

new_File.close()

Will give you output to a file called "mynewfile.txt" that looks like:

0 
1 
2
3
4
5

As far as your pasted code goes, there is something else you arne't telling us... this works just fine.

for x in range(6):
  why = str(x+1)
  print why

1
2
3
4
5
6
share|improve this answer
3  
Context managers are also a good habit to build early on: with open('newfile.txt','w') as fout: ... – mgilson Nov 28 '12 at 0:11

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