Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have and object with an pseudo or special attribute that can be named in three different ways (Note: I don't control the code which generates the object)

The value in the attributes (depending which one is set) is exactly the same, and I need to get that for further processing, so depending of the source of data, I can have something like:

>>> obj.a
'value'
>>> obj.b
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: Obj instance has no attribute 'b'
>>> obj.c
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: Obj instance has no attribute 'c'

or

>>> obj.a
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: Obj instance has no attribute 'a'
>>> obj.b
'value'
>>> obj.c
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: Obj instance has no attribute 'c'

or

>>> obj.a
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: Obj instance has no attribute 'a'
>>> obj.b
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
AttributeError: Obj instance has no attribute 'b'
 >>> obj.c
'value'

I'm interested in getting 'value' and unfortunately __dict__ property does not exist in that object. So what I ended doing for getting that value was just do a bunch of getattr calls. Assuming that possibilities are only three, the code looked like this:

>>> g = lambda o, l: getattr(o, l[0], getattr(o, l[1], getattr(o, l[2], None)))
>>> g(obj, ('a', 'b', 'c'))
'value'

Now, I would like to know whether there is a better way to this? As I'm 100% convinced what I've done :)

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
    
Just to check - there isn't a get_value() (or similar) or as you mention depending of the source of data - no existing (or derivable mapping) of source -> attribute name? –  Jon Clements Nov 28 '12 at 0:43
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

How about:

for name in 'a', 'b', 'c':
  try:
    thing = getattr(obj, name)
  except AttributeError:
    pass
  else:
    break
share|improve this answer
    
I was actually trying to avoid a try/except in this one ..I should've mentioned that :) –  rhormaza Nov 28 '12 at 0:51
    
try/except is the typical pythonic way, any good reason you wanted to avoid it? –  wim Nov 28 '12 at 2:19
    
Not any really good reason, just wanted to keep the code concise and I felt a try/except was a bit too much :) The other thing I was checking now is that the block does not provide a default value in case of none of these properties exist, although that is highly improbable, still I think it is always good to use a defensive approach :) –  rhormaza Nov 28 '12 at 3:01
1  
You can do that using an else statement to the for loop, if that's what you need. As for style matters, the presence of many try/excepts is usual in python - see EAFP –  wim Nov 28 '12 at 3:16
    
I didn't know about using else with for loops :) thanks for that –  rhormaza Nov 28 '12 at 3:53
add comment

There may be a better way to do this depending on the structure of your object, but knowing nothing else, here is a recursive solution that works exactly like your current solution except that it will work with an arbitrary number of arguments:

g = lambda o, l: getattr(o, l[0], g(o, l[1:])) if l else None
share|improve this answer
    
I really liked this one, for the simplicity and the brevity –  rhormaza Nov 28 '12 at 6:10
add comment

This has the advantage of working with any number of items:

 def getfirstattr(obj, *attrs):
     return next((getattr(obj, attr) for attr in attrs 
                  if hasattr(obj, attr)), None)

This does have the very minor drawback that it does two lookups on the final value: once to check that the attribute exists, another to actually get the value. This can be avoided by using a nested generator expression:

 def getfirstattr(obj, *attrs):
     return next((val for val in (getattr(obj, attr, None) for attr in attrs)
                  if val is not None), None)

But I don't really feel it's a big deal. The generator expression is probably going to be faster than a plain old loop even with the double-lookup.

share|improve this answer
1  
I almost posted something to this effect. the problem is that you end up checking twice for the element you want (once with hasattr and once with getattr). Ultimately, I decided it wasn't really better than the explicit loop posted by wim -- Although I'm open to hearing about any advantages this might have over the loop. –  mgilson Nov 28 '12 at 0:35
    
You could use a nested generator to avoid the double-lookup, I guess, but it only happens when it finds the attribute, so I consider it a minor drawback. I just added such a version, however. –  kindall Nov 28 '12 at 0:36
    
nice one...I'm going to have a look..thanks –  rhormaza Nov 28 '12 at 0:52
add comment

I think using dir will get u essentially the same thing __dict__ normally does ...

targetValue = "value"
for k in dir(obj):
    if getattr(obj,k) == targetValue:
       print "%s=%s"%(k,targetValue)

something like

>>> class x:
...    a = "value"
...
>>> dir(x)
['__doc__', '__module__', 'a']
>>> X = x()
>>> dir(X)
['__doc__', '__module__', 'a']
>>> for k in dir(X):
...     if getattr(X,k) == "value":
...        print "%s=%s"%(k,getattr(X,k))
...
a=value
>>>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this one, I completely missed dir()...just wondering now...how dir() call works internally. I'll check –  rhormaza Nov 28 '12 at 0:56
add comment

And another one:

reduce(lambda x, y:x or  getattr(obj, y, None),  "a b c".split(), None)

(in Python 3 you have to import reduce from functools. It is a builtin in Python 2)

share|improve this answer
    
This assumes that bool(obj.b) is True. Consider what would happen here if you had obj.a = 0. I don't think you would pick that up. –  mgilson Nov 28 '12 at 1:15
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.