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I am storing my information in an array of pointers to structs. In other words, each element of the array is a pointer to a linked list.

I don't know how long the array should be, so instead of initializing the array in my main() function, I instead intialize the double pointer

struct graph** graph_array;

Then once I obtain the length of the array, I try to initialize each element of graph_array using a function GraphInitialize:

int GraphInitialize(struct graph* *graph_array,int vertices)
{ 
  struct graph* graph_array2[vertices+1];
  graph_array = graph_array2;
  int i;

  for (i=0;i<vertices+1;i++)
  {
    graph_array[i] = NULL;
  }

  return 0;
}

But for some reason this is not returning the updated graph_array to main(). Basically, this function is updating graph_array locally, and no change is being made. As a result, any time I try to access an element of graph_array it seg faults because it is not initialized. What am I doing wrong?

Edit: Following the convo with Tom Ahh I should add something else that makes this more confusing.

I don't call GraphIntialize directly from main(). Instead, I call getdata() from main, and pass a pointer to graph_array to getdata as shown below.

    getdata(argc, argv, vertpt, edgept, &graph_array)

    int getdata(int argc, char *argv[], int *verts, int *edges, struct graph* **graph_array)

Then getdata gets the number of vertices from my input file, and uses that to call GraphInitialize:

    if ((GraphInitialize(&graph_array, *verts)) == -1)
    {
      printf("GraphCreate failed");
      return 0;
    }

This results in an error: "expected 'struct graph 3ASTERISKS' but argument is of type 'struct graph 4ASTERISKS'.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you assign something to graph_array, you simply assign it to its local copy. The changes made to it in the function will not be see-able by the caller. You need to pass it by pointer value to be able to change its value. Change your function prototype to int GraphInitialize(struct graph ***graph_array,int vertices) and when you call it, use GraphInitialize(&graph_array, 42).

Second problem in your code is when you create graph_array2, you declare it to be local to your GraphInitialize() function. Thus, when exiting your function, graph_array2 is destroyed, even if you assigned it to *graph_array. (the star dereferences the pointer to assign it to the value it points to).

change your assignation to *graph_array = malloc(sizeof(*graph_array) * vertices); and you should be fine.

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Why is the malloc'ing any different? Aren't both examples of allocating memory? –  Ed Cota Nov 28 '12 at 1:18
2  
First allocates the memory on the stack, second on the heap. Stack is local to the function, it is destroyed when the function exit. Second is managed by the user, and memory is destroyed when you explicitly call free() –  tomahh Nov 28 '12 at 1:26
    
I tried this, and got the following error: warning: passing argument 1 of 'GraphInitialize' from incompatible pointer type note: expected 'struct graph ***' but argument is of type 'struct graph ****' very confused. –  Ed Cota Nov 28 '12 at 1:56
1  
Is the declaration of graph_array the same as you wrote in your question ? –  tomahh Nov 28 '12 at 2:01
    
Yes. Well, I'm trying to create an abstract data type, so I declare it as that and then set graph_array = GraphCreate(); where GraphCreate is of type struct graph**. The GraphCreate function is just struct graph** p = NULL; return p; –  Ed Cota Nov 28 '12 at 2:03

Memory is divided into two parts, the stack and the heap. Malloc will give you back a chunk of memory from the heap, which lives on between functions, but must be freed. Thus your program must be careful to keep track of the malloced() memory and call free() on it.

Declaring a variable graph_array2[vertices+1] allocates a local variable on the stack. When the function returns the stack pointer is popped "freeing" the memory allocated in the function call. You don't have to manage the memory manually, but when the function call is over it no longer exists.

See here for some discussion of the two allocation styles: http://www.ucosoft.com/stack-vs-heap.html

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You're using C99-style local array allocation. The array disappears when the function returns. Instead you need to use malloc() to allocate memory that will persist after the function. You can use typedefs to make your code more readable:

typedef struct graph_node_s {  // linked list nodes
  struct graph_node_s *next;
   ...
} GRAPH_NODE;

typedef GRAPH_NODE *NODE_REF;  // reference to node
typedef NODE_REF *GRAPH;       // var length array of reference to node

GRAPH AllocateGraph(int n_vertices)
{
  int i;
  GRAPH g;

  g = malloc(n_vertices * sizeof(NODE_REF));
  if (!g) 
    return NULL;
  for (i = 0; i < n_vertices; i++)
    g[i] = NULL;
  return g;
}
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You have two problems.

First, graph_array2 has auto extent, meaning that it only exists within its enclosing scope, which is the body of the GraphInitialize function; once the function exits, that memory is released, and graph_array is no longer pointing anywhere meaningful.

Second, any changes to the parameter graph_array are local to the function; the changes won't be reflected in the caller. Remember, all parameters are passed by value; if you pass a pointer to a function, and you want the value of the pointer to be modified by the function, you must pass a pointer to the pointer, like so:

void foo(int **p)
{
  *p = some_new_pointer_value();
  return;
}

int main(void)
{
  int *ptr = NULL;
  foo(&ptr);
  ...
}

If you intend for InitializeGraph to allocate the memory for your array, you'll need to do something like this:

int InitializeGraph(struct graph ***graph_array, int vertices)
{
  *graph_array = malloc(sizeof **graph_array * vertices);
  if (*graph_array)
  {
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < vertices; i++)
    {
      (*graph_array}[i] = NULL; // parentheses matter here!
    }
  }
  else
  {
    return -1;
  }

  return 0;
}

int main(void)
{
  int v;
  struct graph **arr;
  ...
  if (GraphInitialize(&arr, v) == 0)
  {
    // array has been allocated and initialized.
  }
  ...
}

Postfix operators like [] have higher precedence than unary operators like *, so the expression *arr[i] is interpreted as *(arr[i]); we're dereferencing the i'th element of the array. In GraphInitialize, we need to dereference graph_array before subscripting (graph_array isn't an array, it points to an array), so we need to write (*graph_array)[i].

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Alright, I tried this, and got the following error: warning: passing argument 1 of 'GraphInitialize' from incompatible pointer type note: expected 'struct graph ***' but argument is of type 'struct graph ****' very confused. –  Ed Cota Nov 28 '12 at 1:53

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