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Not possible to launch a file on a network using Java Desktop?

I am trying to use the Desktop API to launch the appropriate app for a file. So i am using this :

if (Desktop.isDesktopSupported()) 
        Desktop.getDesktop().open(new File(path));

where "path" is a String pointing to the file.

Everything works fine until i try to launch a jpg that resides at a network location (for instance "\\MyNet\folder\image.jpg") when i get an IOException :

java.io.IOException: Failed to open file:////MyNet/folder/image.jpg

Any one knows if there is a way to fix this?

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marked as duplicate by Pursuit, Lex, Justin, Iznogood, RB. Nov 14 '12 at 15:11

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe you need to specify the file location/name in standard URI format - which is close to the standard format except for servers. See the javadocs for the URI Class for more information.

At the highest level a URI reference (hereinafter simply "URI") in string form has the syntax

[scheme:]scheme-specific-part[#fragment]

And a little later:

A hierarchical URI is subject to further parsing according to the syntax

[scheme:][//authority][path][?query][#fragment]

so the URI should look something like the following:

file://MyNet/folder/image.jpg

where "file://" is the protocol, "MyNet" is the server, and "/folder/image.jpg" is the directory location under the share.

Hope this helps a little.

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The main problem being that your URI has four slashes after the file:, while it should only have 2 –  aperkins Aug 31 '09 at 22:59
    
please check out my edits... –  Savvas Dalkitsis Aug 31 '09 at 23:37
1  
I'm sorry - I am not sure which edits you are talking about. –  aperkins Sep 1 '09 at 15:29
    
:D i deleted them and created a dupe. :D check out the comment to find it and vote this closed. Thanks for your answer btw. i voted up. –  Savvas Dalkitsis Sep 1 '09 at 17:53
    
correct that... i can't vote because i changed my old vote and now it wont allow me...unless you edit the answer so i can.. if you want to let me know. –  Savvas Dalkitsis Sep 1 '09 at 17:54
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file:////MyNet/folder/image.jpg is not a file path. It's an URL.

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ok let's say that i have this path "\\MyNet\folder\image.jpg" which points to a network folder. Can i open the file? and how? –  Savvas Dalkitsis Aug 31 '09 at 22:32
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    File f = new File("\\\\192.168.0.4\\mybookrw\\save\\command.txt");
    Desktop.getDesktop().open(f);

Worked fine for me. The one caveat is that you have to be authenticated against the share already. If you paste the path into the run box and it prompts you for a username and password then its not going to work from an app.

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hm... my path is similar to this. it starts with \\\\ followed by the server name followed by the folder structure. And it doesn't work... Maybe because my path has spaces? does it work for you with spaces? –  Savvas Dalkitsis Aug 31 '09 at 23:09
    
please check out my edits... –  Savvas Dalkitsis Aug 31 '09 at 23:37
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Everyone so far has assumed that the file isn't being found.

However, looking at the Desktop open() function, an IOException is thrown

if the specified file has no associated application or the associated application fails to be launched

Now, having said that, what happens if you open a jpg on your local machine? Also, what happens if you try manually launching the jpg through the network?

Edit: Actually, the problem may be that the default program set to open jpg files doesn't understand file:// uris. Sticking with UNC paths might be a better choice.

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