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I don't understand the new C++11 syntax yet for initializing an array in a constructor initilizer list. I'm no longer stuck with C++03 but I can't use boost or std::vector because of program constraints.

An instance of FOO must be sized by the constructor call and behave as though the sizes of x and y were statically known. Does the new C++11 features allow this?

I'm not sure if or how std::initializer_list<> can help.

class FOO
{
public:
    // this constructor needs to size x = count and y = count * 4
    FOO(int count) : 
    {
        // interate over x and y to give them their initial and permenent values
    }
private:
    const BAR x[];
    const TAR y[];
};

#include "foo.h"
void main(void)
{
    // both need to work as expected
    FOO alpha(30);
    FOO * bravo = new FOO(44);
}
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4  
"must be sized by the constructor call and behave as though the sizes of x and y were statically known" -- you do realize that these are contradictory requirements, right? Also, please, tell me the "program constraints" that don't allow you to use std::vector. –  Xeo Nov 28 '12 at 1:20
    
I agree about the contradictory requirements. I have a large amount of static read only data that need to be available to instances of this class. I don't want that data on the heap or the stack. I have since been looking at Marcus' question link and more importantly Bill Forster's reply. My data might be too big to put directly into source code. > [1,000,000]. I wish there was some way to just directly load these records directly into ram/rom at a given memory location that I could use from a pointer. –  wapadomo Nov 29 '12 at 17:45
    
@wapadomo: Welcome to the XY Problem. You asked about initializer_lists and initialization, but what you really wanted was a way to store bulk data in your executable and get a pointer to it. Then you should have asked about that. –  Nicol Bolas Nov 29 '12 at 18:22

2 Answers 2

You can't do what you're trying to do. The sizes of arrays must be compile-time constants. And while the values provided to the constructors in your particular use cases may be compile-time constants, C++ can't know that.

Furthermore, as a statically-typed language, C++ requires being able to compute the size of the class at compile-time. sizeof(Foo) needs to have an exact, single value. And your's can't.

Initializer lists aren't going to help you. You want two runtime-sized arrays; that's what std::vector is for. If you want compile-time sized arrays, you need to use a template type:

template<int count>
class FOO
{
public:
    FOO(initializer_list<Whatever> ilist)
    {
        // interate over x and y to give them their initial and permenent values
    }

private:
    const BAR x[count];
    const TAR y[count * 4];
};

#include "foo.h"
void main(void)
{
    // both need to work as expected
    FOO<30> alpha;
    FOO<44> * bravo = new FOO<44>;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is the template the only way to get compile-time sized arrays? What if I wanted to initialize the arrays at compile-time with a huge amount of data (millions of BAR and TAR)? Surely source code cannot be that large. –  wapadomo Nov 29 '12 at 17:52
    
@wapadomo: Why not? The template is ultimately no different from class Foo { private: const BAR x[50000000]; ... }; once it is instantiated. This is a perfectly valid struct. Whether you can initialize all of the elements of such an array via initializer_list initialization depends on your compiler. So can your compiler handle source files that have millions of lines? The answer to that question has nothing to do with templates. –  Nicol Bolas Nov 29 '12 at 18:18
    
@wapadomo: Personally, I would say that you shouldn't have millions of static entries in your executable, regardless of whether you're using templates or not. Why not load a file? –  Nicol Bolas Nov 29 '12 at 18:20

Besides the answer from Nicol Bolas using template parameters to make the size compile-time configurable, you can also allocate memory on the heap:

class FOO
{
public:
    // this constructor needs to size x = count and y = count * 4
    FOO(int count) : x(new BAR[count]), y(new TAR[count])
    {
        // interate over x and y to give them their initial and permenent values
    }

    // Need a destructor to free the memory we allocated in the constructor
    ~FOO()
    {
        delete [] y;
        delete [] x;
    }
private:
    const BAR* x;
    const TAR* y;
};
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3  
And now you get into the whole deal with the Rule of Three... And you don't even mention it in the answer. –  Xeo Nov 28 '12 at 10:35
1  
Not only that, this code currently leaks memory if new TAR[count] throws. Basically, if you want to go down this route, your best shot is to reimplement std::vector or something very similar. –  Mankarse Nov 28 '12 at 10:58

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