Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following javascript:

<script type="text/javascript">
function changeBet(parseFloat(bet)) {
var moneyline = parseFloat(<?php echo json_encode($win) ?>);
var gain = parseFloat(bet * moneyline);
document.getElementById("PotentialGain").value = gain;
}
</script>

The php variable $win is successfully var_dump'ed as a float. When the variable gain = bet, PotentialGain displays the user input from BetAmount as expected. Here is my echo'ed php code:

echo '<tr>';
echo '<td>type="text" name="BetAmount[]" id="BetAmount" onkeyup="changeBet(this.value);" ></td></tr><tr><td>Potential Gain:<input type="text" name="PotentialGain[]"  id="PotentialGain" ></td></tr><tr><td><input type="Submit" name="send" value="Submit"></td>';
echo '</tr>';

However, I want gain(which is inputted as the PotentialGain value) to be the user input bet * the var moneyline.

The result is NaN. Is there a var that I am not parsing correctly to display the correct numerical value of gain?

Thanks for any help.

share|improve this question
3  
function changeBet(parseFloat(bet)){... - parameters don't work like this. –  ahren Nov 28 '12 at 1:21
3  
just a note, this is just javascript, not jquery –  kennypu Nov 28 '12 at 1:21
    
@ahren thanks, i added that afterwards and the result was blank. Without the parseFloat in function changeBet(parseFloat(bet)){... the result is NaN –  Blaine Hurtado Nov 28 '12 at 1:24
1  
Aside from the error pointed out in the first comment, you're also passing a JSON string (JSON is not an object) into parseFloat. If you're always expecting it to be a number there's no need for that. If you do need to JSON encode it. You'll need to use JSON.parse first to make it an actual javascript object. Then point to the number like objName.someNumber. –  subhaze Nov 28 '12 at 1:26
    
parseFloat(<?php echo json_encode($win) ?> is useless as long as $win does not contain a string literal. If you output a number already, let it be a number. parseFloat only works on strings. –  Bergi Nov 28 '12 at 1:31

3 Answers 3

You can't put a function call where a parameter name is expected.

function changeBet(bet) {
    bet = parseFloat(bet);
    // rest of code
}
share|improve this answer

The problem is the incorrect syntax in this line:

function changeBet(parseFloat(bet)) {

you need to pass a parameter to the function, like this:

function changeBet(bet) {

Then, when you call the function, you can evaluate whatever argument you want to send through parseFloat:

changeBet(parseFloat(strBet));
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, -- @Jack –  Adam Rackis Nov 28 '12 at 1:41
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is the final javascript that I used:

<html>
<script type="text/javascript">
function changeBet(bet) {
var moneyline = <?php echo $win ?>;
var gain = (bet * moneyline).toFixed(2);
document.getElementById("PotentialGain").value = gain;
}
</script>
</html>

My final notes are: 1. To remember to place the javascript function after the code with your php caclculations. 2. Thanks to everyone who clarified parseFloat is not necessary if you know the var is a int (or double in my case). 3. Thanks to everyone who clarified parseFloat did not belong in the function parameter.

Hopefully this helps others out!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.