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I'm doing some coding with Java + Spring. Something like,

public interface PeopleService {}
public class CustomerService implemented PeopleService {}
public class EmployeeService implemented PeopleService {}

Once if I use @Autowired in the code like this,

@Autowired
protected PeopleService peopleService;

The application throws exception of "no unique bean of type [xxxxxxxx] is defined: expected single matching bean but found 2." during the runtime. The problem can be easily fixed by adding @Qualifier("xxxxxx"). However, the annoying part of this problem is that the exception only pops up during the runtime. By which means, if I don't check the annotation carefully before hand manually. it could throw the exception once the application hit the autowired point.

I'm not a fan of manual checking. Just wonder, is there any smart way of testing/detecting such exception before running the application (e.g. during the initialization of the application, or compiling)?

Many thanks.


EDIT:

At the end, I just came up the solution which does a test that will find all classes that extends BasicService, and initialize them one by one to test the uniqueness of autowired beans within each class.

@Test
public void autowireValidationForAllSubclassOfBaseService() {
    ClassPathScanningCandidateComponentProvider provider = new ClassPathScanningCandidateComponentProvider(false);
    provider.addIncludeFilter(new AssignableTypeFilter(BasicService.class));

    Set<BeanDefinition> serverResources = provider.findCandidateComponents("path/class");
    AutowireCapableBeanFactory beanFactory = applicationContext.getAutowireCapableBeanFactory();

    for (BeanDefinition serverResource : serverResources) {
        try {
            Class<? extends BasicService> serverResourceClass =
                    (Class<? extends BasicService>) Class.forName(serverResource.getBeanClassName());
            Object bean = beanFactory.createBean(serverResourceClass, AutowireCapableBeanFactory.AUTOWIRE_BY_NAME, false);
            beanFactory.initializeBean(bean, serverResourceClass.getSimpleName());
        } catch (Exception e) {
            Assert.assertTrue(false, "Autowired might not be handled properly " + e.getMessage());
        }
    }
}

This might not be the best way, but I'm happy with it for now, as it works and detects all possible autowire issue before really running it.

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I don't see any reasonable way to achieve this at compile time, as the compiler can't know the content of your spring context. PS: This is one reason why i'm not a big fan of autowiring (or component scanning for that matter beyond finding @Configuration classes) –  Matt Nov 28 '12 at 4:16
    
Hi @Matt, It seems impossible to achieve the goal during the compiling time. But your comments on testing is inspiring. I'm trying to extend your approach. The idea is to have a test which will find all classes that extends BasicService, and initialize them one by one to test the uniqueness of autowired beans within each class. If the class with autowire fails to initialize, then there could be a problem due to no unique bean. –  Liang Zhao Nov 28 '12 at 5:39
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3 Answers

try to add @Service before public class CustomerService implemented PeopleService {}

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Wow, this approach with @Service or @Component does work! Just not sure to initialize everything at the beginning is a good idea or not. :-) –  Liang Zhao Nov 28 '12 at 4:51
    
in our project,we use this approach,I think it's all right –  SongGuang Nov 29 '12 at 0:38
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Well, you don't need to use @Autowired. You can always do explicit wiring via xml or java.

To wire the following class you could:

public class MyBean {
    private PeopleService peopleService;
    public MyBean(PeopleService peopleService) {
        this.peopleService = peopleService;
    }
}

Xml:

<bean id="customerService" class="the.package.containing.customerservice.CustomerService"/>

<bean id="employeeService" class="the.package.containing.employeeService.EmployeeService"/>

<bean id="myBean" class="the.package.containing.mybean.MyBean">
    <constructor-arg ref="employeeService"/>
</bean>

Java:

@Configuration
public class AppConfig {
    @Bean
    public PeopleService customerService() {
        return new CustomerService();
    }

    @Bean
    public PeopleService employeeService() {
        return new EmployeeService();
    }

    @Bean
    public MyBean myBean() {
        return new MyBean(customerService());
    }
}

Since you seem to be after compile time type safety, I would recommend using the Java based approach, because it gives you that compile time guarantee.

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Hi Nocholas, thanks for your suggestion. It is a good solution for compile time type safety guarantee. However, I'm hesitated about bring in more code. Probably there is no way to achieve both. But I would like to keep the question open for a few more days for other possible alternatives. Thanks again for your solution. :-) –  Liang Zhao Nov 28 '12 at 4:10
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At the end, I just came up the solution which does a test that will find all classes that extends BasicService, and initialize them one by one to test the uniqueness of autowired beans within each class.

@Test
public void autowireValidationForAllSubclassOfBaseService() {
    ClassPathScanningCandidateComponentProvider provider = new ClassPathScanningCandidateComponentProvider(false);
    provider.addIncludeFilter(new AssignableTypeFilter(BasicService.class));

    Set<BeanDefinition> serverResources = provider.findCandidateComponents("path/class");
    AutowireCapableBeanFactory beanFactory = applicationContext.getAutowireCapableBeanFactory();

    for (BeanDefinition serverResource : serverResources) {
        try {
            Class<? extends BasicService> serverResourceClass =
                    (Class<? extends BasicService>) Class.forName(serverResource.getBeanClassName());
            Object bean = beanFactory.createBean(serverResourceClass, AutowireCapableBeanFactory.AUTOWIRE_BY_NAME, false);
            beanFactory.initializeBean(bean, serverResourceClass.getSimpleName());
        } catch (Exception e) {
            Assert.assertTrue(false, "Autowired might not be handled properly " + e.getMessage());
        }
    }
}

This might not be the best way, but I'm happy with it for now, as it works and detects all possible autowire issue before really running it.

share|improve this answer
add comment

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