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This code ...

int main()
{
    using namespace std::placeholders;
    ClassA a;
    ClassB b, b2;
    a.SigA.connect( std::bind(&ClassB::PrintFoo, &b) );
    a.SigB.connect( std::bind(&ClassB::PrintInt, b,  _1));
    a.SigB.connect( std::bind(&ClassB::PrintInt, &b2, _1));

    a.SigA();
    a.SigB(4);
}

Gives the compilation error, "error: reference to '_1' is ambiguous"

It can be fixed by fully qualifying the placeholders ...

int main()
{
    // using namespace std::placeholders;
    ClassA a;
    ClassB b, b2;
    a.SigA.connect( std::bind(&ClassB::PrintFoo, &b) );
    a.SigB.connect( std::bind(&ClassB::PrintInt, b,  std::placeholders::_1));
    a.SigB.connect( std::bind(&ClassB::PrintInt, &b2, std::placeholders::_1));

    a.SigA();
    a.SigB(4);
}

...but why doesn't the first code snippet work?

EDIT

Just to prevent any ambiguity, I am compiling with Clang and Boost 1.52 with --stdlib=libc++ -std=c++0x and the entire code block is this ...

#include <boost/signals2.hpp>
#include <iostream>

struct ClassA
{
    boost::signals2::signal<void ()>    SigA;
    boost::signals2::signal<void (int)> SigB;
};

struct ClassB
{
    void PrintFoo()      { std::cout << "Foo" << std::endl; }
    void PrintInt(int i) { std::cout << "Bar: " << i << std::endl; }
};

int main()
{
    // using namespace std::placeholders;
    ClassA a;
    ClassB b, b2;
    a.SigA.connect( std::bind(&ClassB::PrintFoo, &b) );
    a.SigB.connect( std::bind(&ClassB::PrintInt, b,  std::placeholders::_1));
    a.SigB.connect( std::bind(&ClassB::PrintInt, &b2, std::placeholders::_1));

    a.SigA();
    a.SigB(4);
}
share|improve this question
    
What... compiler are you using? Edit: never mind, clang uses __1 as its weird namespace thing. –  Xymostech Nov 28 '12 at 2:23
1  
If there is something else called _1 in scope, then you will get this error. edit a little too late! –  Slicedpan Nov 28 '12 at 2:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Let's see how the includes work:

#include <boost/signals2.hpp> includes #include <boost/signals2/signal.hpp> which includes #include <boost/signals2/slot.hpp> which includes #include <boost/bind.hpp> which includes #include <boost/bind/bind.hpp> which includes include <boost/bind/placeholders.hpp>, which uses static boost::arg<1> _1;* in the global namespace, hence the ambiguity.

*: Technically, _1 is in an unnamed namespace, but it visible due to a using directive.

One workaround is define the following at the top of your file so that <boost/bind/placeholders.hpp> is not included:

#define BOOST_BIND_NO_PLACEHOLDERS
share|improve this answer
1  
Of all the great answers, this one most directly answers the question, so +1/Accept –  learnvst Nov 28 '12 at 12:58

C++ sees two global identifiers named _1. It has no idea that you mean std::placeholders::_1 instead of Boost's _1. This is one of the reasons why the standard library puts them in a nested namespace: to prevent accidental conflicts like this.

If you need them to be shorter, just create a simple namespace alias:

namespace ph = std::placeholders

Then it's just ph::_1.

share|improve this answer
    
Good suggestion, +1 –  learnvst Nov 28 '12 at 12:57

GCC give the following information regarding your error:

.../include/c++/4.7.0/functional:864:34: \
    error: candidates are: const std::_Placeholder<1> std::placeholders::_1
.../boost/1.49.0/boost/bind/placeholders.hpp:55:15: \
    error:                 boost::arg<1> {anonymous}::_1

The hint to the problem can be found in the 2nd error: boost::arg<1> {anonymous}::_1

The cause is that the boost placeholders are in an anonymous namespace within the global namespace.

namespace
{
    boost::arg<1> _1;
    // etc...
} // unnamed namespace

Since the boost placeholders are in an anonymous namespace and you're importing std::placeholders into the global namespace, they are now both available in the global scope.

As such there is no way for the compiler to know which symbol you are referring to.

As Nicol suggests, use a namespace alias to create a shorthand prefix to std::placeholders::_1 to reduce the typing.

share|improve this answer

Since you are using std::bind I suppose you have some C++11 support. Consider also this version (i.e. prefer lambdas over std::bind)

int main()
{
    ClassA a;
    ClassB b, b2;
    a.SigA.connect( [&](){ b.PrintFoo(); } );
    a.SigB.connect( [&](int i){ b.PrintInt(i); } );
    a.SigB.connect( [&](int i){ b2.PrintInt(i); } );

    a.SigA();
    a.SigB(4);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. Bind is ugly anyway! +1 –  learnvst Nov 28 '12 at 12:57

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