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I have codes like this:

class A{  // declaration is simplified
 virtual void FNC1();
};
bool compare(S s1,S s2){
    return  s1<s2; 
}
void A::FNC1(){
  iterator it;
  sort(it.begin(),it.end(),compare);
}

class B : public A{
 virtual void FNC1();
};
void B:FNC1(){
  iterator it;
  // do something different

  sort(it.begin(),it.end(),compare);
}

So I used class B to inherit class A and overrode the function FNC1(), but the problem is, as in the std::sort() function, the 3rd variable should really be a function, and such function is always directly declared. I really want to know what to do to avoid the copy and paste and make B directly inherit this function. I have tried to put the compare() function as a member function of A, and it won't compile: sort(it.begin(), it.end(), this->compare);

I tried to include the compare function into a separate header file, and it says I cannot declare it. How could I correctly make B inherits this function? Because, in practical, I have 3 classes all need to reuse A's codes and the compare function is really a complicated one.

share|improve this question
    
I can't answer your question because your sample program is incomplete. What are the definitions of S and iterator? –  Robᵩ Nov 28 '12 at 2:25
    
I think it does not matter, I am only writing pseudo code. Typically the S is a struct contains several dimensions and the iterator is an iterator for a vector<S>.. –  Yitong Zhou Nov 28 '12 at 2:27
    
Does the compare function need to be a member of your 'A' class to start with? Could you make it global? –  ryanbwork Nov 28 '12 at 2:28
    
It certainly does matter. Your compare function is designed to compare objects of type S, but your question is about objects of types A and B. What is the relationshp between S and A? –  Robᵩ Nov 28 '12 at 2:28
    
They have no relations, S is only a struct and defined in a separate header file.A B all tries to calculate S objects. –  Yitong Zhou Nov 28 '12 at 2:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your problem is that function compare is defined in the header, meaning that you have its body there in addition to its signature. If you include the header in two places, the compiler will complain about multiple definitions. You should only have the declaration in the header, and the definition in a .cpp file.

This should go into A's header, let's call it a.h

bool compare(S s1,S s2);

This should go into a.cpp

bool compare(S s1,S s2){
    return  s1<s2; 
}

By the way, just to clear up the terminology, you cannot inherit a non-member function. You can use any non-member function anywhere, as long as you include its declaration and link against its object file.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it works! I guess my previous mistake lies in I once tried directly pasting the function implementation into the A.h and since the header is included by many files, I got errors say multiple definition of compare().... So this solves it. I should put declaration in header and implementation in body... –  Yitong Zhou Nov 28 '12 at 2:45

You could make the compare function a static member function of the base class, rather than making it free-standing:

class A{  // declaration is simplified
    virtual void FNC1();
public:
    static bool compare(const A& s1, const A& s2) {
        return ...; // The logic behind your compare function goes here
    }
};

You can use the function like this:

sort(it.begin(), it.end(), A::compare);
share|improve this answer
    
so without a :: before a function, it is really a strange function? Cannot call out side the A.cpp file? but also cannot be redefined? –  Yitong Zhou Nov 28 '12 at 2:29
    
@YitongZhou Without A:: it's not a strange function, it is just a free-standing function. You cannot redefine it, but neither can you redefine a static function. It's just that static functions are member functions, so they have access to private members of the class. Here is a link to a demo on ideone. –  dasblinkenlight Nov 28 '12 at 2:34

You are on the right track. You can simply reuse the compare function, you don't need to modify it or try to "inherit" it or any such thing.

The following should compile and run without error.

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

struct S { int i; };

class A{  // declaration is simplified
public:
 virtual void FNC1();
};
bool compare(const S& s1,const S& s2){
    return  s1.i < s2.i;
}

void A::FNC1(){
  std::vector<S> v;
  std::sort(v.begin(),v.end(),compare);
}

class B : public A{
public:
 virtual void FNC1();
};
void B::FNC1(){
  std::vector<S> v;
  // do something different

  std::sort(v.begin(),v.end(),compare);
}

int main () { A a; B b; a.FNC1(); b.FNC1(); }
share|improve this answer
    
I think I have tried your version, the difference is I paste the function in front of the class definition and does not user an operator redefinition. The compiler error is like " you cannot define the function twice" since the A.h is included in many other classes... –  Yitong Zhou Nov 28 '12 at 2:40
    
Are you saying that you defined compare in the header file? If so, you shouldn't do that. Try declaring compare in a header file and defining it in a .cpp file. –  Robᵩ Nov 28 '12 at 2:41
    
@YitongZhou, I have modified my sample program so that it does not use an operator redefinition. –  Robᵩ Nov 28 '12 at 2:45

The reason it won't compile if you make compare a member of A is probably that you are not making it public or protected. By default, members of a class are private, and a private member cannot be seen by a derived class.

You need:

class A{  // declaration is simplified
{
    virtual void FNC1();

    protected:
        bool compare( S s1, S s2 ){...}
};
share|improve this answer
    
Erm, if you write in this way, not stating it as static I think writing things like sort(it.begin(),it.end(),this->compare) cannot work, I have tried before. –  Yitong Zhou Nov 28 '12 at 2:36
    
It depends where you are calling from. You can only use this->compare from inside A or B. If you want to do this from outside you are right -- it must be static. But then you call it with A::compare, not this->compare. That said, the only places I can see you calling the compare function are in A and B. –  DrBards Nov 28 '12 at 2:55

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