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Is there a way to have git always merge without a fast-forward, except for when pulling?

Following a nice git-flow, I like keeping my branch history (easier to remove features, etc later on), so I have set my config to never fast-forward when merging, like so:

git config --global merge.ff false

However, whenever I update my current branch/pull from the remote, it creates a merge commit... which is really gross, especially for forking other projects on GitHub.

Is there anyway to make a git pull always fast-forward? Unfortunately, I tried doing:

git pull --ff-only upstream master

... only to watch it spit out an error:

fatal: You cannot combine --no-ff with --ff-only.

Thanks, in advance... I'm really tired of seeing this:

Gross: a "git pull" merge commit

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What happens when you override the global setting locally in your repository via git config merge.ff true? –  Matthias Vallentin Nov 28 '12 at 3:50
1  
1) I don't want to change the behavior of my other merges (non-pulls) 2) I don't want to have to change this for each repo I create/work-in –  Rican7 Nov 28 '12 at 4:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can try this:

git pull --rebase upstream master

This will rebase your commits on top of upstream commits.

Here is an illustration of what it does.

Your local repository:

* bbbbbbb (HEAD, master) My changes.
* aaaaaaa Initial commit.

Upstream repository:

* ccccccc (upstream/master) Their changes.
* aaaaaaa Initial commit.

After git pull --rebase upstream master:

* bbbbbbb (HEAD, master) My changes.
* ccccccc (upstream/master) Their changes.
* aaaaaaa Initial commit.
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Damn. I was worried that I wouldn't be able to use my current flow. Thank you for this, however rebasing constantly just feels dirty. –  Rican7 Nov 28 '12 at 6:13
1  
@Rican7 it needs you to watch your step a little bit, but you get a way clearer tree. I've adopted it after being a --no-ff user... –  mgarciaisaia Nov 28 '12 at 6:22

I'd suggest you to work in a separate branch and keep rebasing onto the remote branch instead of merging.

Change:

$ git checkout -b my-topic-branch
$ (work work work)
$ git commit
$ git checkout master
$ git pull origin master
$ git merge my-topic-branch

By:

$ git checkout -b my-topic-branch
$ (work work work)
$ git commit
$ git fetch origin
$ git rebase origin/master
$ git checkout master
$ git merge my-topic-branch

If that combination of configurations don't work, I think you're left with that.

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Thank you. I was trying to stay away from revising, but I appreciate the help. :-) –  Rican7 Nov 28 '12 at 6:17

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