Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using Code First and LINQ to SQL in an ASP.NET MVC4 project. In the below query I'm trying to populate PatientView.Appointments.ScheduledBy, but it's returning null. I've tried adding .Include("Appointments.ScheduledBy"), but Appointments.ScheduledBy continues to return null.

How can I modify the LINQ to SQL expression to get ScheduledBy populated?

Here's my LINQ to SQL (Id is the action's parameter)

var q = from p in context.Patients.Include("Appointments.ScheduledBy")
        where p.Id == Id
        select new PatientView
        {
             Patient = p,
             Appointments = p.Appointments.OrderByDescending(a => a.ScheduledFor)
        };
PatientView pv = q.Single();

PatientView is the view model for the view. The Appointments property does get populated, but the Appointments' ScheduledBy property is null.

public class PatientView
{
    public Patient Patient { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<Appointment> Appointments { get; set; }
}

public class Patient
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Number { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public List<Appointment> Appointments { get; set; }
}

public class Appointment
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public Patient Patient { get; set; }
    public Employee ScheduledBy { get; set; }
    public DateTime ScheduledFor { get; set; }
}

public class Employee
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
}
share|improve this question
    
How can the Appointment's ScheduledFor property be null if it is a non-nullable DateTime? –  armen.shimoon Nov 28 '12 at 3:33
    
I think you are not using Linq to Sql but Linq to Entities. Linq to Sql is something that is not related to Code First (or Entity Framework) –  Pawel Nov 28 '12 at 3:36
    
@armen.shimoon - That was a typo on my part. "the Appointments' ScheduledFor property is null" should have been "the Appointments' ScheduledBy property is null", and I have since edited the question. Thanks. –  Erik Olson Nov 28 '12 at 12:13
    
@Pawel I honestly don't know which is being executed (LINQ to Entities or LINQ to SQL) or how I can tell. I know that I used Code First to create the database and I use LINQ expressions to get data out of and into the DB, but I'm not clear LINQ-wise where the dividing line is between LINQ to SQL and LINQ to Entities. –  Erik Olson Nov 28 '12 at 12:16
    
If you are using System.Data.Entity/DbContext/ObjectContext namespace you are using Linq to Entities. –  Pawel Nov 28 '12 at 14:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.